Showing posts with label Herbs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Herbs. Show all posts

May 12, 2015

How I Used Potatoes to Help Heal an Infection

Sometimes there are personal things I don't like to talk about online, but feel compelled to share because certain information might be helpful to someone else. So I share that personal information anyway. This post is a good example of that.

Part of my ongoing medical difficulties include reoccurring bacterial infections, something my naturopath says can be cured, but will take some time to completely go away. Over the past couple of weeks, I've specifically been fighting a large, painful Staph infection. When my naturopath saw it, I didn't expect her to prescribe antibiotics, like the average MD would. But when she told me to fight the infection with a potato...I admit, I laughed.


I love to read old household guides, so I knew that in the old days, a potato poultice was often used to fight infections - but I guess I assumed this was among the old timey medical ideas that was nonsense. Boy, was I wrong.

This infection has been extremely painful. Bring tears to your eyes painful. The most painful pain I'd ever felt pain. But those potato poultices felt so soothing. And I do believe they are healing. For example, at first my infection was black, blue, and green. I put on my second potato poultice, and when I removed it - all those colors had completely disappeared! The infection was now pink. And slowly, as I applied the poultice several times each day, the infection got smaller and smaller.

(Important note: My infection really started to do some serious healing, however, after I asked for prayer on Facebook. Within 45 minutes, the terrible pain was gone, and a day later, the infection was draining, and half it's original size.)

Then I had an even bigger surprise: Not only do herbalists and naturopaths use potatoes to fight infections, but modern scientists do, too! Scientists know that more and more bacteria are becoming resistant to antibiotics, so they are studying different ways to fight these types of infections...and they are looking to the humble potato for help. It turns out, a substance in potatoes prevents bacteria from attaching to human cells - preventing infection. Soon, doctors may have us use a potato extract to prevent and reduce bacterial infections of every kind.


How to Make and Use a Potato Poultice:

1. Scrub your hands with warm water and soap for 30 seconds.

2. Using a vegetable brush and warm, running water, scrub the potato. And organic is best - fresh from the garden is even better. Do not peel the potato! (The compound being studied as a way to treat bacteria is found in the first few millimeters of the vegetable.)

3. Using a grater just washed in hot, soapy water, grate a small amount of the potato - just enough to cover the infected area about 1/4 in. deep.

4. Apply the grated potato to the skin. Cover with a clean hand towel. Keep in place for 20 - 30 minutes.

5. Gently remove all the grated potato and dispose of in the trash. (It's not a bad idea to dump the used potato in a plastic bag, seal it, and toss it in the trash can.)

I used my potato poultice three times a day.

Of course, infections of any kind can be quite serious. My naturopath advised me to take my temperature twice a day - once in the morning, and once in the early evening. If I'd developed a fever, I would have rushed to the doctor. In addition, if the infection had spread or took a long time to heal, my doctor would have prescribed more medical intervention.


 

Feb 9, 2015

Mullein: The Common Weed That's Good Medicine

On this blog not long ago, I mentioned giving my sick husband mullein tea; I wanted to include a link to where I'd posted about the medicinal properties of this common weed - but soon discovered I'd never made such a post! Somehow, I'd neglected to share this important plant with you. So although mullein won't appear in your yard or wilderness areas until spring, I want to share information about mullein now. That way, when you do spot mullein growing in your area, you can harvest some of the plant for your medicine cabinet.

Many herbal recipes aren't proven by science - primarily because there is little to no profit in spending time and money on testing them. But mullein, in many cases, has been tested and found beneficial. My family has greatly benefited from this herb - so much so, I let it grow in my yard, wherever the wind and birds plant it's seeds. Yes, even if it's in the middle of the tomato patch!


Identifying Mullein

Mullein is sometimes called "cowboy toilet paper" because it has velvety soft leaves that, could, I suppose, serve as toilet paper. (But those leaves also have little hairs on them, so I wouldn't personally want to use it in place of TP!) In the mullein's first year, it grows a rosette of those soft, elongated, oval, gray-green leaves that stay low to the ground.
Mullein in it's first year. (Courtesy of Hardyplants at English Wikipedia.)
In the plant's second year, it grows a tall stem without branches. Depending upon growing conditions, this stem can get quite high - at least several feet, up to around six feet.
Mullein in it's second year. (Courtesy of Magnus Manske and Wikimedia.)
The plant's stem-less yellow flowers (about 1 1/2 inches across when fully open) grow on this pole-like stem and bloom from late spring to early fall
Mullein beginning to bloom. (Courtesy Leslie Seaton and Wikimedia.)
Mullein blooming. (Courtesy MPF and Wikimedia.
Mullein flower. (Courtesy H. Zell and Wikimedia.)
Mullein Flowers as Medicine

Mullein flower oil (or an infusion of the flowers in olive oil) has long been used as an ear infection cure, and two scientific studies support claims that it works at least as well - and perhaps better than - antibiotics. Mullein flowers are also sometimes used to treat gout and migraines, as well as bruises, rashes, and skin irritations.

Mullein Leaves as Medicine

Mullein leaves are analgesic (pain relieving), antihistaminic (for treating allergic reactions), anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, astringent, antiviral, inhibits bacterial growth, and works as a fungicide. In addition, mullein leaves are traditionally used to treat diarrhea and congestion in the chest. They've been used to treat wounds, hemorrhoids, and skin infections, too. Web MD notes that mullein is used for "cough, whooping cough, tuberculosis, bronchitis, hoarseness, pneumonia, earaches, colds, chills, flu, swine flu, fever, allergies, tonsillitis, and sore throat. Other uses include asthma, diarrhea, colic, gastrointestinal bleeding, migraines, joint pain, and gout. It is also used as a sedative and as a diuretic to increase urine output." In addition, a tea made from the leaves helps relieve hemorrhoidal irritation or perineal itching. (For ease of application, place the tea in a sitz bath.)

Mullein Roots as Medicine

Mullein roots are traditionally used for urinary and bladder control (including problems due to a swollen prostate). The roots are also a diuretic and a mild astringent.

According to herbalist Jim McDonald, “One of my students used an infusion of Mullein root to treat Bell's Palsy that occurred as a complication of Lyme's disease, and it resolved the problem completely. Years after that David Winston told me he'd been using it for Bell's Palsy for well over a decade, and considered it useful in other cases of facial nerve pain…”


More commonly, a decoction of the roots is used to treat toothaches, and to stop cramps and convulsions. The roots may also be used to treat migraines and sciatica.
Mullein leaves. (Courtesy John Tann and Wikimedia).
Preparations

Tea of leavesPack a tea ball with dried leaves. Pour boiling water into a cup, add the tea ball, and steep. Cover with a saucer while steeping, until the tea stops steaming.

Tea of roots: Boil 1 tablespoon of dried root in 1 cup water for 10 - 15 min. Pour the liquid through a coffee filter or double layer of cheesecloth. Drink up to 3 cups per day.

Compress of flowers: Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1 tablespoon of dried flowers; cover. Steep until cool; strain. Soak a clean cloth in the tea, wring it out and place it on the affected areas. Cover the compress with plastic wrap. Change it twice daily.

Steam: Add a handful of flowers to a bowl of hot water. Cover head with a towel and deeply inhale the vapors.

Oil of flowers (for Ear Infections/Ear Wax Build Up/ Infected Piercings/Ear Mites in animals):  Pick fresh flowers and let them wilt for a few hours to reduce their moisture content. Put the flowers in a clean glass jar. Fill the jar with olive oil. (You might need to top it off the following day.) Cap the jar and place it in a warm location for about a month. Strain through a coffee filter or a double layer of cheesecloth. Pour into a clean glass jar. Apply with a Q-tip. (Mullein flower oil is often combined with infused garlic oil.)


CAUTIONS: When using Mullein leaves, always strain them from liquid, since they have little hairs that can prove irritating. The entire Mullein plant is said to possess slightly sedative and narcotic properties; personally, my family has never experienced these. The seeds of Mullein are considered toxic and have been historically used as a narcotic.



Disclaimer 
I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.  

Dec 8, 2014

Herbal Remedies for Winter Illnesses

Cold and flu remedy.
No matter how great your immune system is, no matter how careful you are about hand washing and not touching your face, you will - at some point - get a winter sickness. At our house, my husband often brings germs home from work - and usually at this time of year. (Blegh!) But there are several natural medicines you can take to either help prevent illness or to shorten the amount of time you are ill.*

Apple Cider Vinegar

If taken as soon as the very first sensations of illness are felt, Dian Dincin Buchman's cold and flu remedy really works! I've never had it fail...unless I waited a day or more to start taking it. The remedy includes raw apple cider vinegar, cayenne pepper, and sea salt. You'll find the entire recipe is here.

Quite popular right now is something called the fire cider remedy, which is also said to wipe out sickness if you take it at the first sign of being illness. I've not tried it yet, but here is a good recipe. (Recipes do vary, but should usually contain raw apple cider vinegar, garlic, horseradish, cayenne pepper, and turmeric.)

Now let's assume you didn't catch your illness early on. You can still use raw, organic apple cider vinegar as a remedy. It is an antimicrobial (meaning it's generally considered antibiotic, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral), and I've been using it for years to help clear up mucus and prevent sinus infections (which I used to get with every cold). Here is a good recipe.

Honey

Raw honey has anti-inflammatory properties and is also antimicrobial. It makes a sore throat feel better and might even help you fight off a cold or the flu. You can simply place a tablespoon or so of raw honey in chamomile or Fight the Flu tea, or you can pour some on a tablespoon and eat it all by itself. Read more about honey as medicine here.

Mullein tea.
Mullein

If you have cough or chest congestion, you'll definitely want to take some mullein. Although you may not have heard about this common weed, it's powerful, traditional medicine. (In fact, I was shocked to discover I haven't blogged about it before. I promise to give mullein it's own post very soon. You can learn more about it here.) The leaves of this plant have long been used to treat coughs, bronchitis, pneumonia, sore throats, tonsillitis, and fevers.

If you haven't gone out in spring, summer, or early fall to collect and dry mullein leaves, you can purchase them over at Mountain Rose Herbs. The easiest way to use the leaves is to make a simple tea: Crumple up some of the dried leaves, put them in a tea ball, and place the tea ball in a cup. Bring some water to a boil. Pour over the tea ball and cover the cup with a saucer. When the tea has stopped steaming, remove the saucer and drink the tea. The tea may make you feel sleepy.

Garlic

Some studies show that taking raw garlic can prevent colds - and certainly raw garlic is a well known as an antibiotic. But most studies indicate consuming garlic doesn't do much for colds you already have. Nonetheless, if you have swollen glands, or want to use garlic to prevent a cold, peel a garlic clove and cut it into small pieces. Swallow like a pill.

Salt

Here's one natural remedy even conventional doctors recommend: Gargling with salt water, or using salt water along with a neti pot. Natural salt (without iodine) is best. (You can buy special salt water packets for your neti pot, or use this recipe.) Also, when using a neti pot, be sure to use only distilled or sterilized water.

Black or Green Tea

Both black and green tea contain catechin, which some studies show may have antimicrobial properties. Plus, warm drinks feel comforting when your sick and can help break up congestion.




Disclaimer 
I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.  




May 16, 2014

Dandelion Medicine: Using the Common Dandelion Medicinally

The more I learn about the common dandelion, the more I'm amazed at how unappreciated it is. If you're a regular reader, you already know what an excellent food dandelions are. (In fact, I wrote a whole  cookbook packed just with dandelion recipes.) But did you know that dandelions are great medicine, too? In Canada, dandelion is a registered health product, and for many, many centuries, the dandelion has been prized for its medicinal properties.

Dandelion roots, before dehydrating.
Dandelion Root Medicine

Perhaps the strongest dandelion medicine comes from the plant's roots, which are used to detoxify the liver (I can personally attest to how well this works), kidney, and gallbladder. Some believe the root may also help treat diabetes, yeast infections, gout, PMS (again, I've had great success here), and eczema. Dandelion root and the herb uva ursi have also been shown to reduce urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women. (Uva ursi is not safe for long term use, however.) The roots are also rich in inulin, which is a prebiotic that encourages healthy microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract, so the root is great for upset stomach, too, and may be beneficial to diabetics.

Perhaps the most exciting use of dandelion root is the treatment of cancer. There are many anecdotal accounts of the root curing cancer (click here to read one), and currently the root is being studied scientifically for the treatment of cancer.

In addition, the roots are packed with beta-carotene, calcium, vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6, B12, C, E, P, and D, biotin, inositol, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc.

For medicinal purposes, the roots are usually dried and made into a tea (click here for a complete how to). The dried root can also be ground up in a coffee grinder and added to water or juice. In orange juice, there is no detectable flavor. Drink 2 - 3 times daily.


Dandelion Leaf Medicine

Dandelion leaf.


Dandelion leaves are a scientifically proven diuretic - meaning they increase the amount of urine the body produces, and thereby reduce swelling and bloating. And unlike most other diuretics, dandelion leaves won't cause a potassium deficiency. Dandelion leaves are also thought to improve kidney function and strengthen the immune system, as well as sooth an upset stomach and put an end to constipation.

The leaves also happen to be packed with vitamin A, B, C, and K, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, carotenes, and fiber.

You can eat dandelion leaves, just like you'd eat any other greens (like kale or collards). However, you have to catch them in the early spring, before they flower and become bitter. (Bitter leaves can be made less bitter by boiling them for a minute, then changing the water and boiling again for a minute, then changing the water again and boiling for one minute...but this process also decreases the nutrients and medicinal properties in the leaves.)

You can also puree the leaves in a smoothie, or make an infusion of the leaves. For the latter, Dian Dincin Buchman, Ph.D., writes in her book Herbal Medicine that you should use one pint of boiling water for every handful of leaves (and flowers, if available). Steep for 10 minutes, then strain. If desired, add a little honey to offset bitter leaves. Drink the infusion 2 - 3 times a day. Leaves may also be dehydrated and crumbled into a tea ball to brew medicinal tea.

Dandelion flower.
Dandelion Flower Medicine

Dandelion flowers are a known diuretic and are thought to improve the immune system. The flowers are also packed with antioxidants and are a superb source of lecithin - which is believed to maintain brain function and may slow or stop Alzheimer's disease. Lecithin is also supposed to be good for the liver. Additionally, dandelion flowers are a good source of vitamins A, B, and C, beta-carotene, iron, zinc, and potassium.

For the best medicinal results, use the flowers to make a simple tea that you may drink 2 - 3 times a day. Click here for a how to. The leaves may also be dehydrated and made into tea, but bear in mind older flowers will burst into seed in the dehydrator.

Dandelion Stem Medicine

Dandelion stems are traditionally used on scrapes and cuts, to speed healing. Just break open a dandelion stem and apply the sap to the affected area.


_________________________
Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook
Did you know you can turn dandelion leaves, flowers, buds, stems, and roots into tasty and healthy treats? Learn more about eating and cooking with dandelions in my #1 Amazon Bestselling paperback or ebook, The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook.


For more information about harvesting and using dandelions, see these posts:

"Ah Sweet...Dandelions?" (including a recipe for cooking dandelion leaves)
How to Make Dandelion Tea (from the roots of the plant)
Making Dandelion Jelly
Teaching Children to Forage (with dandelion cookie recipe) 
Eating Dandelion Flowers
How to Preserve Dandelion Greens
Dandelion Flower Fritters
Dandelion Leaf Noodles
Dandelion Leaf Green Smoothie
Dandelion Root Medicine: Where to Find It, How & Why to Use It
How to Make Dandelion Wine


Cautions: According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, very rarely, people have reactions to dandelion. If you're allergic to "ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion. In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin. People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should consult their doctors before eating dandelion." Dandelion is a diuretic, which means it may also make other medications less effective. To learn more about this, visit the University of Maryland Medical Center website.





Disclaimer 
I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.  


May 1, 2013

Calendulas for Beauty and Herbal Healing

Calendulas* are one of my favorite garden plants. They are among the first flowers to bloom in the spring, and they keep going strong until the first hard frost of fall. They spread (if you allow them to) and have cheerful flowers. And they are good medicine.

The yellow or orange petals are the most-used part of the plant - and they are sometimes called "Russian penicillin."  Calendula officinalis has astringent, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiviral, and immunostimulant properties. It's often used to clean cuts and scrapes; heal chapped skin; ease burns, bruises, and bee stings; treat acne; cure rashes, athlete’s foot, and yeast infections; sooth diaper rash and more. It also stimulates the body's production of collagen - which means you're less likely to scar if you apply calendula.

You can also gargle with calendula-steeped water to ease sore throats - and it's good for painful periods, too. It's traditionally used to add color to butter, cheese, and sauces, and can be sprinkled atop salads, cakes, and...well, whatever you wish.

Plus, the plant is pretty as can be in the garden, and easy to grow from seed. It's even said to repel aphids, tomato hornworms, eelworms, and asparagus beetles. And, according to Discovery Health, there are no known side effects when using calendula as food or medicine.

How to Harvest Calendula
Ideally, wait to harvest until the morning, after the flowers have opened up and the dew has dried from them. But, truly, it won't matter much if you get to the harvesting later in the day. Use scissors or pruning shears to snip off the flower heads just above a double set of leaves. This ensures the plant will continue blooming. Don't be afraid to harvest the flowers often; it will only encourage the plant to bloom more.


How to Dehydrate Calendula
Dried calendula petals are perfect for tea. They can also be used in cooking (rehydrate first) or medicinal recipes. Place full flower heads on the tray of a dehydrator set at 105 degrees F. Dehydrate until the petals are completely dry and crispy. Pull the petals from the flower heads and place in an air tight container stored in a cool, dry, dark location.

Calendula Menstrual Tea
Place dried calendula petals in a tea ball. You may either pack the entire ball with calendula or you may pack half the ball with the petals, filling the other half with another menstraul-relief herb like dandelion root, red raspberry leaf, or sage.


Place the tea ball in a cup and pour boiling water over it. Cover the cup with a saucer and allow to steep until the water stops steaming.

Soothing Calendula Oil
This oil is appropriate for cradle cap, rashes, or  chapped skin. It can also be used for massages, or it may be added into lip balm, cream, or lotion.

Pour some dried calendula petals into a non-reactive double boiler. Pour organic olive oil over the petals, covering by 1 inch. Stir. Place the double boiler over low heat and keep at 100 degrees F. for 5 hours. (Alternatively, put the calendula and oil in a glass jar and place in a warm location, like a sunny windowsill,  for 6 weeks, shaking the jar every day.) Strain, lining the sieve with cheesecloth. Pour the resulting oil into a clean jar and store in a dark location.

Calendula Salve
It's easy to make a healing salve out of calendula oil. Just stir together one part calendula oil and approximately one part melted beeswax. Pour into a glass jar and cover with a well fitting lid. The mixture will thicken and can be used for rashes and abrasions.

Calendula in Cooking Recipes
The easiest way to use calendula petals is in a salad, but for more ideas, check out the recipes at the bottom of this article.

To Allow Calendulas to Spread in the Garden...Or Not
 If you want Calendulas to spread in your garden, filling in blank spots, make sure you let some flower heads go to seed in the fall. To prevent calendula from spreading, just cut off the flower heads when they look spent. Planting calendulas near driveways and other areas of cement will also help limit spreading.

WARNING: Calendula should not be taken internally during pregnancy.

* Calendulas are sometimes called "pot marigolds," but they are not truly a type of marigold.



Disclaimer 
I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.  
 




Oct 12, 2012

The Plague, West Nile, and Thieves' Vinegar

Thieves' Vinegar herbs from the Bulk Herb Store.
Did you know the plague is back? Yes, I mean the same Black Death that ravaged the world in the 14th century. In the last year or so, there have been diagnosed cases of the plague in Oregon, Colorado, New Mexico, and California; go back a few more years, and you'll find cases in Washington, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma. (See the Centers for Disease Control, CDC, website for more information.) It seems most cases are of bubonic plague, spread by biting or scratching insects and animals. (To learn more about how the plague is spread, check out this post by the state of Vermont, as well as this piece at Wikipedia.)

Add to this the news that the West Nile virus (spread by biting mosquitoes) is spreading in the U.S., and you have a case for thinking more about bug spray!

All these recent news stories immediately brought to my mind the legend of the Thieves' Vinegar. For those who are unfamiliar with this story: It's said that during the Black Plague four men were stealing valuables off dead, infected bodies. When they were finally caught, the local law told them if they'd reveal how they escaped becoming infected, they'd set the thieves free. Supposedly, one of the thieves said his sister was an herbwife who gave them a special vinegar to spray themselves with in order to protect them from the disease.


Whether or not there is any truth in the story is something we'll probably never know. The earliest record I can find of the recipe isn't until 1910, in Scientific American. It lists rosemary, sage, lavender, rue, camphor dissolved in spirits, garlic, cloves, and distilled wine vinegar as the "original" ingredients, but it's clear Thieves' Vinegar has many variations and that the original recipe is probably lost to history.

But then I happened upon the Bulk Herb Store's write up on Thieves' Vinegar. What impressed me here was the idea of using modern knowledge about herbs to determine which antique ingredients might be most effective. And then I read the comments at the end of the post, which include stories about using the Bulk Herb Store's recipe to stave off insects in the Amazon.

I plan to can some of this Thieves' Vinegar, according to the directions given at the Bulk Herb Store's website, then transfer the vinegar to a small spray bottle to use as needed. Will it protect my family from the plague? I can't say for certain. But I do believe it will make an organic, safe insect repellent.

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Disclaimer 

I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.