Showing posts with label Recipes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Recipes. Show all posts

Jun 8, 2017

How to Make Celery Salt (Plus: How to Dehydrate Celery)

This post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own. Please see FCC disclosure for full information. Thank you for supporting this site!

We have but one celery plant in our garden, yet it's enough to supply all our celery needs. That's because celery is a "cut and come again" plant, meaning you can cut off the stalks and new ones will grow in their place. Given that our plant is prolific, and given that it's getting huge now that it's spring, I recently cut all the larger stems off and decided to preserve them as celery salt (SO delish on meat and eggs!). I also made some plain dried celery.

Dehydrating the celery was easy: I cut up the stalks, laid them on dehydrator trays (covered with fruit roll sheets that prevent small pieces from falling through the trays' holes), set the dehydrator to 135 degrees F., and waited for the pieces to dry. It only took about 5 hours. These chopped, dried, stalk pieces are perfect for adding to soups and stews, come cool weather.

But I also had a ton of celery leaves I wanted to do something with. When I cook with fresh celery, I normally chop up the leaves and add them to whatever I'm cooking. They add celery flavor, but not crunch. So I dehydrated the leaves, too - and could have left them as is, to also add to soups and stews. But instead, I made really yummy celery salt.





How to Make Celery Salt

You can make celery salt with dried celery leaves, dried celery stalks, or even with celery seeds (but not seeds designed for planting in the ground; they may be treated with chemicals). For salt, I  recommend sea salt, since table salt or iodized salt will impart a less pure flavor. You may use either coarse or fine salt.

1. Powder dried leaves, stalks, or seeds. I used a food processor, but you could use a blender. If you're using leaves, a mortar and pestle, or even your fingers, will also do the trick.

2. Combine the salt and celery powder. The ratio you use is a matter of personal preference. I used half and half (equal parts), but some people prefer a 1:2 ratio, using more of whichever flavor, salt or celery, they want to emphasize.

3. Pour the celery salt into an air tight container, like a glass jar with a lid.

Watch this video to see just how easy it is!



Jun 5, 2017

Crazy Easy No Sugar Chocolate Peanut Butter Bites

Here's a recipe I think everyone can agree is healthier than that certain famous peanut butter candy - and delicious, too. There are tons of copycat recipes for that famous brand, and even many no-sugar and keto-friendly adaptations. But I wanted to make something simple. I wanted to make something without any added sweetener. And I wanted a treat - a fat bomb - that would satisfy me. Here's what I whipped together. And now my only problem is they are so yummy, I'm tempted to sit down and eat them all!

Those of you eating carby foods will, I hope, appreciate this as a good alternative to sugar-laden candy. Each piece is only about 9 calories. But those of you in the low carb or keto world will also enjoy this treat as a dose of fat that will keep you filled up and satisfied until your next meal. In fact, if you want to make this recipe even fattier, you can easily do so by simply adding more coconut oil.

Do we miss the sugar from that famous brand? Nope. Even my sugar loving kids beg for these babies.

And by the way, this recipe also proves you don't need to buy special fat bomb making molds. My sis-in-law actually recommended an ice cube tray, which most of us still have laying around somewhere or can buy for a buck at Walmart. It works perfectly for this recipe.




https://sites.google.com/site/proverbs31womanprintables/crazy-easy-chocolate-peanut-butter-fat-bombsCrazy Easy Chocolate Peanut Butter Fat Bombs

Note: I used Lilly's dark chocolate chips, which are lightly sweetened with Stevia. You could also use a chopped up Lilly's chocolate bar, or any other no sugar, low carb candy bar you prefer. Many health food stores carry Lilly's; if not, Vitacost has the best online price I've seen. And hey, place your first order with them, though this link, and you'll get $5 off your order!)






6 oz. Lilly's dark chocolate chips
2 teaspoons coconut oil
Natural, no sugar added peanut butter (I used Adam's; you could also use other no sugar added nut butters.)

1. In a small saucepan placed over very low heat, melt the chocolate chips and coconut oil, stirring often until smooth.

2. Spoon about 1 teaspoon of melted chocolate into the bottom of one cube in an ice cube tray. It should make a rather thin layer of chocolate.

3. Put about 1 teaspoon of peanut butter on top of the chocolate.

4. Drizzle about 1 teaspoon of melted chocolate over the peanut butter.

5. Repeat until the chocolate is all used up. Freeze.

Makes about 17 cubes.

Approximate Nutrition per cube: 1.17 g. carbohydrates; 2.74 g. fat; 1.3 g. protein; .33 g. fiber; 9.15 calories. (I recommend you do your own calculations based on your ingredients and the size of your ice cube tray.)


May 11, 2017

Skillet Brussels Sprouts with Parmesan Sauce Recipe

I'm not afraid to shout to the world that I LOVE BRUSSELS SPROUTS! In fact, my whole family does - even my picky eaters. Because they are in season right now, I've been experimenting with new ways to eat them. That experimentation has resulted in this recipe (based on one found at PeaceLoveAndLowCarb) - which has turned into one of our absolute favorites. It's packed with delicious flavors. Yum!

Incidentally, if you're afraid of the sauce - which you shouldn't be - but if you are, feel free to omit it, and simply cook the Brussels sprouts in the pan, as directed. Of course, I would at least add butter on top afterward. Enjoy!

https://sites.google.com/site/proverbs31womanprintables/skillet-brussels-sprouts-with-parmesan-sauceSkillet Brussels Sprouts with Parmesan Sauce Recipe 


1 1/2 lbs. Brussels sprouts

6 bacon slices, cooked, drippings reserved (bacon is optional; if desired, substitute drippings with butter)
2 tablespoons butter   
1 tablespoon dried onion flakes
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
3 garlic cloves, minced
Salt
Pepper
   
1. Prepare the Brussels sprouts by trimming the ends. Cut each sprout in half.

2. Place a large skillet over medium high heat and add the bacon drippings. Add the butter. Once the butter is melted, add the Brussels sprouts and onion flakes.

3. Saute, stirring occasionally until the spouts are well browned and can easily be pierced with a fork. (Parts of the sprouts will look black; that's good!) Remove from the heat.


4. In the meantime, create the sauce in a small saucepan: Pour the heavy cream, Parmesan, and garlic into the pan and place over medium heat. Season with salt and plenty of pepper.

6. Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce the heat to low. Allow to simmer and thicken, stirring occasionally. Pour sauce over Brussels sprouts and serve.

Makes about 4 servings. 

Estimated Nutrition, according to SuperTracker; Carbs 10 g.; fiber 3 g.; fat 25  g.; protein 12  g.; calories 303 g.


Apr 20, 2017

Perfect Pork Chops with Spicey Green Beans Recipe (Keto, LCHF, Paleo, Low Carb Recipe)

Keto, LCHF, Paleo, Low Carb RecipeThis post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own. Please see FCC disclosure for full information. Thank you for supporting this site!

 Is it scary for me to put the words "perfect" in the title of this recipe? Yeah, a little...'cuz you can't please everybody. But truly, this is the most perfect pork chop recipe I've ever eaten, and my hubby - who is super-picky about how his meat is cooked - feels the same way. And yes, I know the photos make this look like any other pork chop and green beans recipe. My photography skills are definitely lacking. But I do believe you will find the meat moist and highly tasty, and the green beans cooked thoroughly while still being crispy, with some excellent, spicy flavor.

Happily, this is a meal that's pretty quick to make, too, and fits with a variety of diet-lifestyles, including Paleo, keto (LCHF), and low carb. 

https://sites.google.com/site/proverbs31womanprintables/perfect-pork-chops-with-spicey-green-beans-recipe
Pan Fried Pork Chops with Sauteed Green Beans Recipe


For the green beans:
Green beans, stem ends removed
Sea salt
Black pepper
Garlic clove

For the pork chops:
Pork chops (bone-in is best)
Seasoned salt
Black pepper
Cayenne pepper
Bacon drippings
Butter

1. Place a pot of water on the stove over high heat. Once it comes to a boil, add the green beans. Immediately start timing 3 minutes.

2. When 3 minutes are up, drain the beans and plunge them into cold tap water. Allow to sit until step 6.

3. Season the pork chops, front and back, with a generous amount of seasoned salt, and pepper. Sprinkle lightly with cayenne pepper - unless you like a lot of hot spice, in which case, slather it on!


4
. Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium high heat, adding a rounded tablespoon of bacon drippings and 1 tablespoon of butter. Add the pork chops, working in batches, if needed. (If the fat "cooks away," add more butter to the next batch of chops.)

5
. Cook one side of the pork chops for about 3 minutes, then turn over. Cook the other side for about 2 minutes, or until a thermometer placed in the thickest part of the chop (nut not next to the bone) reads 145 degrees F. Remove from the pan, place on a platter, and put inside the oven. Do not turn on the oven's heat.
Allow to sit at least 5 minutes before serving. 

6
. In the meantime, pour the green beans into the same skillet used to cook the pork chops. Do not clean the skillet first; you want all those wonderful drippings that are still in the pan to help flavor the vegetables. If there's not much fat in the skillet, add a dollop of bacon drippings. Season the green beans with salt, pepper, garlic and s
auté until bright green.

Estimated Nutrition, according to SuperTracker; per one medium-sized (about 6 oz.) pork chop: calories 394; Carbs 0 g total; Protein: 24 g.; Fat: 46 g. Per 1 cup of green beans: calories 39; Carbs 9 g total; Protein: 2 g.; Fat: 0 g.

 

Apr 12, 2017

How to Make Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut in a Mason Jar

Now is a great time to make homemade, DIY sauerkraut. It's healthier than store bought (because all those good probiotics are still in there, whereas most store bought sauerkraut is "dead" of probiotics), cheaper than store bought, and fun and easy, too. Here's my preferred method - which, incidentally, does not require any special tools. For written instructions, click here.





Jan 4, 2017

How & Why to Get Started with an Electric Pressure Cooker or Instant Pot - with 31 Pressure Cooker Recipes!

This post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own. Please see FCC disclosure for full information. Thank you for supporting this site!

There are three main reasons pressure cooking is fantastic:

1. Pressure cooked food retains 80-95% of its nutrients - the most of any cooking method.
2. pressure cooking reduces energy use by 70% or better (depending on what type of pressure cooker you use).
3. Using a pressure cooker, you save a lot of time!

What I love most about using my Instant Pot (which is an electric pressure cooker) is that sometimes I save on total cooking time...but always, I save personal time because I can throw the food in the Pot and walk away. There is literally NO need to stir, adjust settings, or check on the food until it's ready to eat. This means extra time with the kids, to write, to read...to do whatever I want. I love that!

Some people are scared to pressure cook because they've heard horror stories about pressure cookers exploding. This used to happen back in Grandma's day, but as long as you follow some very basic guidelines (found in your pressure cooker's owner manual), it doesn't happen with today's electric pressure cookers.

Others wonder what on earth they'd cook in a pressure cooker. A simple answer is that if you'd normally slow cook it,  boil it, braise it, or steam it, you can pressure cook it. And today's pressure cookers even off more variety. For example, the Instant Pot (IP) allows you to saute, make yogurt, proof bread, and even bake some things. Another thing I love about my IP is that usually I only have to dirty one dish to make a meal - the pot or "bowl" of the pressure cooker. (Fewer dishes and more free time? How can you beat that!)



So far, I've cooked perfect, easy peel hard boiled eggs; super quick (unsoaked) dry beans; yogurt; meat; stock; and (oh yeah) meals in my IP. (Oh, and whole, fall-off-the-bones, chicken that's so much better than anything I've roasted before!) It's so easy! And the food is really delicious. In fact, I've made several of my slow cooker recipes in my IP and my family strongly believes they taste much better when pressure cooked. I'm at the point now where I don't want to cook...unless it's with my IP. I love it that much.
Cheesecake can be tricky to bake...but not in an Instant Pot!
Why an Electric Pressure Cooker?

For years, I've used my wonderful Presto pressure canner for occasional pressure cooking. (Read this to clarify the difference between pressure cookers and pressure canners.) But it was a bit of a pain. Not only is my Presto hard to clean (because the pot is so large it doesn't fit in the sink), but I had to keep checking on the pot, making sure the pressure was where it was supposed to be.

But with an electric pressure cooker, there is a removable pot (Instant Pot is the only pressure cooker I'm aware of that has a stainless steel pot (remember that non-stick coatings are unhealthy). This pot can go right into the dishwasher. In addition, there is no need to regulate the heat of the stove top and adjust as necessary. In other words, an IP is about as hands-free as cooking gets!

Why An Instant Pot?

Instant Pots cook at a lower psi, which makes them a bit safer than other pressure cookers. In addition, they are highly versatile, with yogurt, saute, and slow cook features. (Though I understand the slow cook feature isn't perfect. I personally haven't tried it yet.)
An antique pressure cooker. Thank goodness for modern tech!

Instant Pot Recipes

* Hard boiled eggs. So easy and they peel easily every single time! Place 1 cup of water in the IP stainless steel pot. Add the trivet. Place eggs on the trivet. (You can stack eggs on top of each other, if needed.) Put the bowl in the IP and shut the lid. Turn the vent to "Seal." Press "Steam." Press the "Adjust" button until it reads 5 minutes. When the 5 minutes are over, let the IP do a natural release for 5 minutes. Remove the stainless steel pot from the IP (using hot pads), remove the eggs, and dunk in cold water for 5 minutes.

* Dry Beans 

* Yogurt 

* Risotto

* Brown Rice 

* Frozen Ground Beef 

* Taco Meat

* Sloppy Joe Meat 

* Stock or Bone Broth

* "Rotisserie" Chicken 
 
Yogurt made in my Instant Pot.

* Chicken Breasts

* Chicken & Dumplings 

* Salmon 

* Beef Stew

* Kalua Pig

* Baked Potatoes 

* Mashed Potatoes 

* Potato Salad 

* Crispy Potatoes 

* Loaded Mac & Cheese 

* Lasagna 

* French Onion Soup 

* Split Pea & Ham Soup 

"Roasted" chicken is fall apart tender in an IP.*
* Baked Beans

* Steamed Broccoli

* Breakfast Hash 

* Ham, Egg, and Cheese Casserole 

* Cheesecake 

* Chocolate Pudding 

* Applesauce 

* Popcorn



Other Helpful Links:

* Pressure Cooker Recipe Converter
* How to Convert a Recipe to a Pressure Cooker Recipe 
* How to Convert Old Pressure Cooker Recipes
* 10 Things You Need to Know About Instant Pot
* 8 Instant Pot Basic Techniques
* My Pinterest Pressure Cooking Board


* Photo courtesy of Joe Randazzo.

Dec 28, 2016

How to Make Yogurt in an Instant Pot

This post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own. Please see FCC disclosure for full information. Thank you for supporting this site!

I'd been eyeballing electric pressure cookers for a while, but since I could use my Presto pressure canner as a pressure cooker, I was hesitant to spend money on another kitchen gadget. Then I learned about the Instant Pot. This pressure cooker is so versatile, on Black Friday, I took the plunge...and I'm so glad I did! Later, I'll type more about this super handy machine that has pretty much taken the place of both my stove and my crock pot, but today I want to show you how it makes yogurt.

I've long been an advocate of homemade yogurt. Not only is it much cheaper, but it's healthier, too. There are no weird chemicals or artificial ingredients in it, and you control exactly how much sugar (if any!) to add. For some time, I made yogurt in my crock pot, and thought it was easy as could be. But I've since learned it's even easier in an Instant Pot.

An added bonus: Now I can make more yogurt at one time (which means I have to make it less often). (But if you don't want to make a full gallon of yogurt at one time, you can easily make small quantities of it instead.)

How to Make Yogurt in an Instant Pot

1 gallon milk* (makes about 4 1/2 quarts of yogurt)
6 oz. container of plain or vanilla store bought yogurt that contains "live active cultures"
1/2 cup of powdered milk (optional, for thickening. The photos here are of yogurt that hasn't been thickened)
Even without thickener, my whole milk yogurt is pretty thick.

1. Begin by making sure everything you'll be using is very clean. Run utensils through the dishwasher, wash your hands thoroughly, and then sanitize the Instant Pot's stainless steel bowl by doing the following: Put 1 cup of water in the bowl, and turn the valve to "Sealing." Press the "Steam" function. Press "Less" (a.k.a. "-") until you've set the IP to run 1 minute. Once the IP has done this, release the pressure and pour the water out of the bowl.

2. Scald the milk. Some people consider this an optional step, but it is recommended, no matter what kind of milk you're using. Without it, it's possible for a strain of dangerous bacteria to develop in the yogurt. Pour the milk into the IP bowl. Close the lid. Push the "Yogurt" button, then push the "Adjust" button once so the display reads "Boil." When the IP display reads "Yogrt," you're done scalding. (For me, using a gallon of milk, the scalding process takes about 30 minutes. It should take less time if you're using smaller quantities of milk.)




3. Now wait. The milk needs to reduce in temperature so you don't kill the active cultures you're about to add to it. You want the milk to be about 115 degrees F....Or, if you're like me, just wait until you can put a (clean!) finger into the milk comfortably. Use common sense here, and don't burn yourself! (The waiting takes about 30 - 40 minutes if you're using a full gallon of milk.)

4. Add the container of store bought yogurt, stirring in a zig-zag pattern until the yogurt is completely dissolved in the milk.

5. Put the lid back on the IP. The valve can be in any position. Press the "Yogurt" button, then press the "Adjust" button to achieve the amount of time you want the yogurt to sit. Eight hours is typical, but some people prefer to have their yogurt sit for longer; just remember, the longer it sits, the more tart it becomes. You will need to let the yogurt sit for a minimum of 6 hours, or it won't thicken. When this time is up, don't worry if the yogurt looks thin. It will thicken once it chills. It should, however, be thicker than milk.
Stirring in fruit.
And that's it!

At this point, I spoon the yogurt into canning jars and pop them in the fridge. Let them sit overnight so the yogurt can thicken. When you're ready to serve, you may notice watery stuff on top of each jar. That is whey. Stir it into the yogurt, if you like (it's got lots of good nutrients), or pour it off. (It's an excellent treat for chickens!) Don't dump it down the drain, because it has the potential to acidity rivers or other natural water sources (depending upon how waste water is treated in your area). For more ideas on what to do with whey, click here and scroll down.

With future batches, you can use your homemade yogurt as a starter. (I use 1 cup.) Over time, though, the cultures in your homemade yogurt probably will weaken, and periodically you may need to use store bought yogurt as your starter.


If You Want Less Yogurt
I like to add mashed fruit to our yogurt.

If you need less yogurt, just use less milk and add about 1 teaspoon of store bought yogurt per 1 cup of milk.

You can even make your yogurt in ready-to-go canning jars. To do this, change the way you scald the milk: First put the trivet in the IP, along with 1 cup of water. Put the canning jars on the trivet and pour the milk into the canning jars. (You may use any size canning jar that fits in the IP with the trivet in place. Most people use jam jars.) Set the valve to "Sealing" and push the "Steam" button. Push the "-" button until it's down to 1 minute. When the IP is done, push "Cancel" and allow the contents to cool naturally to115 degrees F. When it's time to add the store bought yogurt, add about 1 teaspoon per 1 cup of milk.


To Make the Yogurt Thicker

Add 1/2 cup powdered milk when you add the store bought yogurt. Or, strain the yogurt. (Straining will reduce the volume of the yogurt by half.) FYI: Store bought yogurt is usually thickened with gelatin or pectin.


How to Sweeten Your Homemade Yogurt

In the past, I've used honey or homemade jam to sweeten our yogurt, but recently I've found a better option - one that pleases everyone in my family (which is not easy to do!):

* Put 2 cups of fresh or frozen fruit in a saucepan placed over medium heat. If desired, add sugar. (I use 1 cup of cane sugar; my family thinks this mixture makes the yogurt taste like store bought.) Stir often until the mixture thickens a bit. If you like chunks of fruit, use a potato masher or two knives to cut up the fruit. Otherwise, puree the fruit mixture with a blender.

I store this mixture in canning jars in the fridge. For large servings of yogurt, I add about 2 - 3 teaspoons of this mixture to the bowl. It makes the yogurt no longer tart, but also not super-sweet.


f you’re going to make yogurt in little jars, anyway, you can sanitize the jars and scald the milk at the same time (as shown in the video). Add a cup of water and the steamer basket into Instant Pot. Pour the milk in the jars and place the jars in the cooker. Set the valve on the lid to “Sealing” push the [steam] button and then the [-] button until you get down to one minute. When the program is finished push [cancel] to turn off the instant pot and let it cool down naturally.

Read more: Instructions & VIDEO: How to make Yogurt with Instant Pot DUO & SMART http://www.hippressurecooking.com/video-how-to-make-yogurt-in-instant-pot-duo/
Step 1: Sanitation Ensure that all of the equipment, containers and utensils to be used in the yogurt-making process are carefully cleaned. This ensures that no other bacteria compete with the yogurt starter during the incubation. If you’re making the yogurt directly in Instant Pot’s stainless steel container, sanitize the cooker by running Instant Pot on the pressure steam program for one minute with one cup of water. Set the valve on the lid to “Sealing” push the [steam] button and then the [-] button until you get down to one minute. When the program is finished, release the pressure and then pour out the water. Then, scald the milk by pushing [yogurt] button and [adjust] until the screen says “Boil”. Let Instant Pot bring the milk to a boil until the screen says “Yogt”. If you’re going to make yogurt in little jars, anyway, you can sanitize the jars and scald the milk at the same time (as shown in the video). Add a cup of water and the steamer basket into Instant Pot. Pour the milk in the jars and place the jars in the cooker. Set the valve on the lid to “Sealing” push the [steam] button and then the [-] button until you get down to one minute. When the program is finished push [cancel] to turn off the instant pot and let it cool down naturally. For both milk that has been scalded in the pot or little jars, wait until the yogurt cools down to at least 115F/46C before proceeding to the next step. That can take anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour (make sure to take the temperature with a clean thermometer). If you don’t have a thermometer handy, you’ll want to wait until the jars are cool enough to handle.

Read more: Instructions & VIDEO: How to make Yogurt with Instant Pot DUO & SMART http://www.hippressurecooking.com/video-how-to-make-yogurt-in-instant-pot-duo/
* What Kind of Milk to Use

I always use store bought, whole cow's milk. But truly, you can use any type of milk you like - except ultra pasteurized milk (UHT). If you use reduced fat milk, you will probably want to use powdered milk as a thickener, or at least strain the yogurt once it's done. I have even heard of people using coconut or almond milk to make Instant Pot yogurt. But whatever milk you choose, make it the freshest milk possible. That means you should use only an un-opened carton or jug of milk.