Showing posts sorted by relevance for query dandelion jelly. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query dandelion jelly. Sort by date Show all posts

Apr 28, 2012

Making Dandelion Jelly

Canning Dandelion Flower Jelly
For a couple of years, I've thought it would be fun to try making dandelion jelly. I'd never eaten it, And wouldn't it make a really unique, fun gift? But somehow I thought I'd need bucketfuls of dandelion flowers in order to make the stuff, so I always put it off. Recently I realized how wrong I was. And the end result is really gorgeous jelly that tastes very similar to honey. 

When it comes to collecting the dandelion flowers, pick only where you know the plants haven't been exposed to chemicals (including weed killers). Most parks use chemicals to control weeds, and dandelions growing along the roadside "soak up" nearby pollution, so I suggest looking in wild fields or your own yard.

My children and I picked enough dandelion flowers from our front yard to fill a medium sized mixing bowl. It took us less than 5 minutes. Then I dumped the flowers into a colander and washed away any bugs and dirt. I let them drain a bit, then I removed the yellow petals from the green part of the flower. It took me perhaps a 50 minutes to pinch those petals away. Another time, I'll get the kids to help me and it will go much faster.

 Although this is a canning recipe, you may also make the jam and refrigerate it right away, without canning it. It will last several weeks.



Dandelion Flower Jelly Recipe

4 cups dandelion petals
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
4 cups granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract (not imitation vanilla extract)
6 tablespoons powdered pectin (I used Ball's "Class RealFruit Pectin")

Boiling water bath canner
Jelly jars
Lids and rings
Ladle
Funnel (optional but very helpful)
Large pot
Jar lifter
Plastic mixing spoon
Wire cooling rack or towels


1. Review the guidelines for using a boiling water bath canner. Fill the canner and place clean jars inside it. Keep the jars in the canner and the water in the canner hot.


2. Dump the dandelion petals in a stainless steel pot. Add 8 cups of water. Boil for 10 minutes.

3. Place a bowl on the counter or in the sink and set a fine strainer over it. Carefully pour the dandelion petal mixture through the strainer. Press down on the petals with the back of a spoon in order to extract as much of the golden liquid as possible. Discard the petals. (Don't put them down a garbage disposal because they form a tight clump that might clog it). Thoroughly clean the strainer, removing any petals that stick to it.
 4. Place another bowl on the counter or in the sink. Place the strainer over it. Place a coffee filter inside the strainer. (If the strainer is large, use multiple coffee filters, to cover the whole surface of the strainer.) Carefully pour the strained dandelion liquid through the strainer again.

5. Clean the pot so there are no petals or debris in it. With a clean measuring cup, measure out 3 cups of the dandelion liquid and place it in the pot. Add the lemon juice, vanilla extract, and pectin. Bring to a full rolling boil that can't be stirred down with a spoon. Add the sugar and stir to dissolve.

6. Bring the mixture to a full boil and, stirring constantly, boil hard for 1 minute. Remove the pot from the stove.

7. Ladle the jelly into hot jelly jars, leaving about 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars with a damp, clean towel. Place the lids on the jars and make the screwbands fingertip tight.

8. If desired, measure out another 3 cups of dandelion petal liquid and repeat steps 6 through 8. (If you try to double the recipe and use all the dandelion liquid at once, the jelly may be too runny.) Process jars for 10 minutes* in a boiling bath canner.

Every 3 cups of petal liquid makes about 4 pints of jelly.

* If you live at a high altitude, read this important information about adjusting canning times.

NOTES: Any remaining dandelion petal liquid can be refrigerated for use in teas. Or, pour into ice cube trays and freeze for iced tea.

Some dandelion jelly recipes call for pouring the jelly into sterile jars and sealing without processing in a hot water bath canner. However, this increases the risk of food poisoning and is no longer a recommended practice.

______________________

Ultimate Dandelion CookbookDid you know you can turn dandelion leaves, flowers, buds, stems, and roots into tasty and healthy treats? Learn more about eating and cooking with dandelions in my #1 Amazon Bestselling paperback or ebook, The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook.



For more information about harvesting and using dandelions, see these posts:

"Ah Sweet...Dandelions?" (including a recipe for cooking dandelion leaves)
How to Make Dandelion Tea (from the roots of the plant)
Teaching Children to Forage (with dandelion cookie recipe) 
Eating Dandelion Flowers
How to Preserve Dandelion Greens
Dandelion Flower Fritters
Dandelion Leaf Noodles
Dandelion Medicine 
How to Make Dandelion Wine
Dandelion Root Medicine: Where to Find It, How & Why to Use It
Dandelion Leaf Green Smoothie


Cautions: According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, very rarely, people have reactions to dandelion. If you're allergic to "ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion. In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin. People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should consult their doctors before eating dandelion." Dandelion is a diuretic, which means it may also make other medications less effective. To learn more about this, visit the University of Maryland Medical Center website.
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May 23, 2013

The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook - It's Here!

As many of you know, I have a great love of cooking with dandelions. Although my family was skeptical when I first served up this common weed, they've always enjoyed the foods I cook with them. It's with glee that family members get a jar of dandelion jelly for Christmas or a box of dandelion cookies "just because." And my husband and children look forward to everything from sauteed dandelion leaves to dandelion stem ice cream to dandelion flower fritters.

So The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook was a joy to write and prepare. In this book, I'll teach you why dandelions are such excellent food, how to identify them in the wild, how to preserve every part of the plant, and give you important knowledge about when to harvest the plant so it's tasty. And, of course, there are recipes. 148 of them, plus variations. And it's available in both Kindle format (full color interior) and paperback (black and white interior).

The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook features recipes for every part of the dandelion. For example, from the leaves you can make:

Sauteed greens
Dandelion-minestrone soup.
Noodle
Vinegar
Chips
Pizza
Risotto
Breads (including cornbread, bread pudding, and swirl bread)
Breakfast dishes
Casseroles
Stuffed meats
Dumplings
Gumbo
Enchiladas and fajitas
Pesto and pasta dishes 

Quiche and savory pies
Stews
Soups
Salads
Smoothies
Dandelion lasagna.
and more.

From the honey-like flowers you can make:

Jelly and marmalade
Vinegar
Oil

Pickles
Syrup
Omelets and pancakes
Cookies
Fritters
Dandelion flower syrup.
Biscuits, breads, and muffinsSorbet
Tea
Soda

Wine
and more.

From the unopened buds you can make:


Pickles
Fried "popcorn"
Omeletes
Dandelion root ice cream.
Stir frys
Soup
and more.

The stems can be cooked like noodles and the roots (which have a coffee-like flavor) can be used for:

Roasted roots (with or without other root vegetables)
Cake
Sautees
Meat rubs and marinadesPickles
A coffee-like drink
Tea
Root beer and beer
Ice cream
and more!


Here's what advanced readers had to say about the
Dandelion roots in tomato sauce.
cookbook:

"I was eager to read this book in order to find out the best ways to harvest, freeze and dry dandelion flowers. But what a delight to discover it also offered a treasure trove of info about the history, nutritional/ medicinal applications and new and traditional recipes for this humble, prolific plant. I was also surprised to learn about the different parts of the plant that could be used in cooking, especially the unopened bud. This book is worth it for the dandelion jelly recipe alone -- but, oh my! I can't wait to try the recipes for stem noodles -- and the dandelion tea . . . and the roasted roots . . . and
the ice cream . . . and . . . ! I highly recommend this book to anyone curious about integrating fun and
Pickled dandelion buds.
nutritious dandelion recipes into their diet. I consider it essential reading for fans of natural, wild foods and for culinary dabblers! "
Suzannah Doyle Music

"First of all I had no idea dandelions could be eaten, let alone used for so many awesome things. The author of this book gave me info and practical ways to help my family eat better and have a natural variety!!" Simplysage

"Kristina Seleshanko has created a wonderful collection of enticing recipes, all featuring those yellow-top, front yard pests: dandelions. She includes some rather expected dishes, like
Dandelion enchiladas.
omelets, salads and soups. Other recipes, however, are likely to catch readers off guard, like pizza, soda, jellies, wine and even ice cream and cookies! What I enjoy most about this cookbook is the abundance of education. The author includes valuable nutritional information, but also instructions on how to harvest dandelions, how to preserve them and store and what alters the taste of these greens. She's obviously very knowledgeable. All in all, this book is an excellent value at a great price."
Tanya Dennis

"I was so excited to read this book and I was so pleasantly surprised beyond what I ever expected!
Dandelion noodles.
It is packed with great recipes that anyone can use. I am a busy mom and I was so happy to see many recipes that can be made quickly with healthy God grown ingredients. Lots of basic tips on general items. Makes dandelions very easy to approach."
virginia l

"I found the recipes delightful and well written, many of which reminded me of recipes that my husband's grandmother has shared. I would highly recommend this cookbook for anyone that wishes to try new and exciting flavors using what is mistakenly considered a ho-hum lawn weed!"
Fae Lynn

Click here to order your copy!



For more information about harvesting and using dandelions, see these posts:

"Ah Sweet...Dandelions?" (including a recipe for cooking dandelion leaves)
How to Make Dandelion Tea (from the roots of the plant)
Making Dandelion Jelly
Teaching Children to Forage (with dandelion cookie recipe) 
Eating Dandelion Flowers
How to Preserve Dandelion Greens
Dandelion Flower Fritters
Dandelion Medicine
Dandelion Leaf Green Smoothie
Dandelion Root Medicine: Where to Find It, How & Why to Use It
How to Make Dandelion Wine
Dandelion or Spinach Noodle Recipe

Dec 3, 2013

Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook - now in paperback!

Many readers have asked for a print version of my #1 bestselling ebook The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook. Now it's available!

The print version of The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook has all the same great recipes and information as the ebook, with black and white photos inside. It makes a great Christmas present, too, since the best dandelion greens are just around the corner - after the snow melts!

From Amazon:

"An Amazon #1 Bestseller!
Become a dandelion hunter! 148 dandelion recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, and even dessert! What if someone told you one of the world’s most nutritious foods is also tasty, can be cooked many different ways, is easy to find, and is totally free? I know what I’d do: I’d run out and grab some! Well, the good news is, there is such a food: Dandelions. Yes, those pesky weeds with bright yellow flowers you’ve grown up thinking are the enemy of perfect lawns are actually food – brought to North America by immigrants who knew how valuable they are.
Every part of the dandelion is edible:
* Dandelion greens recipes are common throughout Europe and often used in salad, quiche, lasagna and other pasta dishes, and many other familiar and less-familiar dishes.
* The honey-like flowers are a healthy and tasty addition to bread, omelets, pancakes, and more – plus they make delectable dandelion wine, dandelion jelly, and dandelion wine.
* The buds are often pickled or added to stir frys and other dishes.
* The stems can be eaten like noodles.
* And the roots add coffee flavor to everything from ice cream and cakes to drinks. And let's not forget dandelion root tea!
The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook offers 148 recipes, plus expert advice and tips, for cooking all parts of the dandelion – one of nature’s best free foods.
Here's what readers have to say about the book:



"5 Stars. Here is what we had for dinner last night: Dandelion noodles, picked with revenge in my garden, and eaten up with zest! So great, and so easy to make this recipe from the brand-new Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook. You can see pictures on my blog."

Caleb Warnock
author of Backyard Winter Gardening and other books
CalebWarnock.blogspot.com

* * *
"5 Stars. I was eager to read this book in order to find out the best ways to harvest, freeze and dry dandelion flowers. But what a delight to discover it also offered a treasure trove of info about the history, nutritional/ medicinal applications and new and traditional recipes for this humble, prolific plant. I was also surprised to learn about the different parts of the plant that could be used in cooking, especially the unopened bud. This book is worth it for the dandelion jelly recipe alone -- but, oh my! I can't wait to try the recipes for stem noodles -- and the dandelion tea . . . and the roasted roots . . . and the ice cream . . . and . . . ! I highly recommend this book to anyone curious about integrating fun and nutritious dandelion recipes into their diet. I consider it essential reading for fans of natural, wild foods and for culinary dabblers!"

Suzannah Doyle
Composer & Musician
SuzDoyle.com
* * *
"5 Stars. Kristina Seleshanko has created a wonderful collection of enticing recipes, all featuring those yellow-top, front yard pests: dandelions. She includes some rather expected dishes, like omelets, salads and soups. Other recipes, however, are likely to catch readers off guard, like pizza, soda, jellies, wine and even ice cream and cookies! What I enjoy most about this cookbook is the abundance of education. The author includes valuable nutritional information, but also instructions on how to harvest dandelions, how to preserve them and store and what alters the taste of these greens. She's obviously very knowledgeable. All in all, this book is an excellent value at a great price."

Tanya Dennis
Writer & Editor
TanyaDennisBooks.com
* * *
 "5 Stars. What a fantastic book! I have seen dandelion recipes here and there, and am determined to try my hand at dandelion cordial, but this book has it all. The author went to great pains to give a very comprehensive book on dandelions in every form. With this book you will learn to use every part of the dandelion to make foods and beverages for every meal of the day. If you are interested in frugal living or just trying something a little different, get this book and get out in the yard and start picking!"

Jennifer Shambrook
Author of I Can Can Chicken!
JenniferShambrook.com


The paperback of The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook is $12.21 on Amazon - and you can still get the Kindle ebook version for just $2.99. Order it today and have it in time for Christmas!

_________________________



For more information about harvesting and using dandelions, see these posts:

"Ah Sweet...Dandelions?" (including a recipe for cooking dandelion leaves)
How to Make Dandelion Tea (from the roots of the plant)
Making Dandelion Jelly
Teaching Children to Forage (with dandelion cookie recipe) 
Eating Dandelion Flowers
How to Preserve Dandelion Greens
Dandelion Flower Fritters
Dandelion Medicine
Dandelion Leaf Green Smoothie
Dandelion Root Medicine: Where to Find It, How & Why to Use It
How to Make Dandelion Wine
Dandelion or Spinach Noodle Recipe


Jan 11, 2016

Dandelion Root Medicine - Where to Find It, How & Why to Use It

Dandelion Root Medicine Where to Find it How and Why to Use it
The more I learn about dandelions, the more amazed I am. Not only is this common weed a wonderfully edible plant, but it has great medicinal properties, too. For example, my mom-in-law has had some painful kidney stones. I recently recommended she drink dandelion root tea - a pretty widely accepted remedy for them. Dandelion root is especially good for her, too, since she's a cancer survivor, and there's some evidence (currently being studied scientifically) that ingesting ground up dandelion root is an effective cancer treatment.

I also consume dandelion root daily, in an effective natural treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease called Lipotropic Complex. Dandelion root is one of the main ingredients - and if I ever run out of the pills, I make sure I have a few cups of dandelion root tea a day. Other medicinal uses for this root include detoxifying the body, gallbladder woes, yeast infections, gout, PMS, diabetes, eczema, and urinary tract infections. Dandelion roots are also rich in inulin, a prebiotic that encourages healthy microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract. You can read more about the medicinal value of dandelions here.

But here's the thing: I find that many people just never get around to harvesting dandelion roots for themselves. Some people tell me they have trouble finding dandelions except where pesticides are sprayed - or they can only find them by roadways, where the plants leach up fumes and therefore are unsuitable for consuming. I have one friend (who lives in a different state) who says there are no dandelions in her area (!). I even have one friend who gets the heebie jeebies just thinking about digging up and touching live plant roots. Fortunately, there are several options for obtaining dandelion roots - and for consuming them, too.

Where to Buy Dandelion Roots
Dandelion Roots
Dandelion roots fresh from my yard.


Believe it or not, you can buy dried dandelion roots in many places. I've seen them on Ebay and Etsy - but I recommend buying them from a more trusted source, so you can be sure you are getting real, organic roots. Mountain Rose Herbs, for example, sells dandelion roots in several forms. There's also a product called Dandy Blend that combines roasted dandelion root with a few other herbs for a really delicious drink that tastes similar to coffee; I've seen Dandy Blend in health food stores, and on Amazon.

Another option is to look in an ordinary grocery store, in the tea section. The brand I see most often is Traditional Medicinals Dandelion Root Tea. I've found it at Walmart for a little over $4 a box.

And, of course, you can harvest your own roots. Click here for complete directions on harvesting and drying dandelion roots. 

Finally, I've seen dandelion root in pill form. However, not only is this the most expensive option available, but I haven't seen these pills from a high quality and trustworthy supplement company.

Which Type of Dandelion Root is Best for You?

Dandelion root comes in four basic forms:

Dried:

dried dandelion root pieces













Roasted:
roasted dandelion coffee













Powered:

powdered dandelion root











and in tea bag or "coffee" form:

dandelion root tea












Plain dried dandelion root is quite bitter; I actually enjoy the flavor, but many people add red raspberry leaf or a bit of real honey to lesson it's bitterness. Roasted dandelion root tastes a lot like instant coffee. Which you choose is really a matter of personal preference. In either case, though, you'll need a coffee grinder to prepare the roots for medicinal use. (Here's the grinder I've used for years).

Pre-ground dandelion root is, in my opinion, not as good an option, since grinding the root and letting it sit means it's lost more of its medicinal properties. You'll always end up with a better quality drink if you grind just before consuming.

Dandelion root in tea bags or "coffee form" is, in my opinion, the least medicinal option. That's because it's pre-ground, and - in the case of tea bags - none of the power actually gets consumed by the tea drinker. (The powdered root is held inside the tea bag.) Nevertheless, this is the easiest way for most people to get dandelion root into their diet, and if brewed according to the package directions, personal experience tells me it's still pretty effective. To make it better still, considering breaking open the tea bag and following the directions in the next section.

How to Consume Dandelion Root

For medicinal purposes, dandelion root is usually turned into some type of drink. Ideally, that drink allows you to digest some or all of the powdered dandelion root. This is accomplished by grinding the root at least partially and using it to fill one half of a mesh tea ball.  (Whenever you make medicinal tea, steep it covered until the drink stops steaming. Click here to see full instructions for grinding and making the tea.)

ground dandelion root in tea ball
When making dandelion root tea with a tea ball, fill half the ball with partially powdered root.

Or you can completely powder the root 1 or 2 tablespoons at a time and place it in a glass of water. If you really dislike the flavor of dandelion root, place the powder directly in orange juice, which completely or mostly (depending upon who you talk to) covers up its flavor.

__________________________________


Ultimate Dandelion CookbookDid you know you can turn dandelion roots into tasty treats, including ice cream, meat marinade, and beer (alcoholic and non-alcoholic)? Learn more about eating and cooking with dandelions - including the roots - in my #1 Amazon Bestselling paperback or ebook, The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook.



For more information about harvesting and using dandelions, see these posts:

"Ah Sweet...Dandelions?" (including a recipe for cooking dandelion leaves)
How to Make Dandelion Tea (from the roots of the plant)
Making Dandelion Jelly
Teaching Children to Forage (with dandelion cookie recipe) 
Eating Dandelion Flowers
How to Preserve Dandelion Greens
Dandelion Leaf Green Smoothie
Dandelion Flower Fritters
Dandelion Leaf Noodles
Dandelion Medicine 
How to Make Dandelion Wine 



Cautions: According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, very rarely, people have reactions to dandelion root. If you're allergic to "ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion. In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin. People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should consult their doctors before eating dandelion." Dandelion is a diuretic, which means it may also make other medications less effective. To learn more about this, visit the University of Maryland Medical Center website.

Disclaimer 
I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.  

Apr 27, 2012

Eating Dandelion Flowers (Dandelion Flower Tea Recipe)

To most people, dandelions - with their bright yellow flowers - are just an annoying weed. But I've learned a secret our ancestor's knew well: Dandelions are fantastic food and good medicine.

I've blogged before about foraging for dandelions, eating their leaves ("dandelion greens"), and using their roots as a medicinal tea (sometimes called a substitute for coffee). Today, however, I want to focus on the weed's sunny yellow petals.

Nutritional Information on Dandelion Flowers

Uncovering nutritional information about dandelion flowers is much more difficult than digging up the goods on dandelion roots and leaves (which are both highly nutritious). However, I did find a couple of sources claiming the flowers are a superb source of lecithin - which is believed to maintain brain function and may slow or stop Alzheimer's disease. Lecithin is also supposed to be good for the liver.

Another source says dandelion flowers are a good source of vitamins A, B, and C, beta-carotene, iron, zinc, and potassium.

And if you can't stand the bitterness in dandelion roots or leaves, take note: The flowers are mildly sweet. One caution, however; if you have allergies to ragweed, marigold, mums, daisies, or yarrow, you might be allergic to dandelion flowers, too.

Harvesting Dandelion Flowers

First, choose only dandelions you are certain haven't been sprayed with chemicals. Road side or park dandelions are not recommended. Instead, choose weeds from your own yard, or from a wilderness area.

To harvest, simply pick off the flowers. Wash in a colander under cold, running water. I recommend letting the flowers dry a bit before you attempt to remove the petals, or you'll find the petals stick to your fingers. When the flowers are dry, remove as much of the green parts as possible without making the flowers fall apart. Use as soon as possible.

NOTE: Most sources stress that when using dandelion flowers, all the green parts must be removed. I have found that it doesn't matter a bit if some green pieces get mixed in - and as I explain below, sometimes the green parts actually improve the recipe.


Link

How to Eat Dandelion Flowers: Dandelion Flower Tea Recipe

Link
Tea is a popular way to get the benefits of dandelion flowers. Pluck the petals from 8 to 10 flowers and pack them into a tea ball. Place the tea ball in a cup and pour boiling water over it. Steep for about 10 - 15 minutes. Serve hot or cold.
I find this tea almost tasteless, which is probably why many people add fresh lemon or lime juice to it. A better solution, I think, is to leave the green parts attached to the petals, following all the other directions given above. This produces a mild tea with a pleasant earthy flavor.

You can also make the tea with dehydrated dandelion flowers. (Dehydrate flowers, with green parts in tact, on 95 degrees F. until completely dry. You may find that some of the flowers go to seed while in the dehydrator; discard those.) Follow the same procedure but use about 6 to 8 dehydrated dandelion flowers. If you prefer the tea without the green parts of the flower, I find it best to store dehydrated flowers with their green parts intact; you can remove the petals as you need them for tea or other recipes.

Frying the flowers
is another popular way to consume them. Mix together about 2 tablespoons of cornmeal, seasoned with salt and pepper, plus a pinch of oregano and thyme. Beat an egg and dip the flowers, one at a time, in it. Then roll the flowers in the cornmeal mixture. Fry in a pan with a little heated olive oil in it.

You might also try dandelion wine (something I haven't tried yet, but hear is good; there's also pink dandelion wine), dandelion flower fritters, dandelion flower syrup, or dandelion flower jelly (see my tutorial here). Some people just put the raw flowers or petals into salads, too.

But if you want the most easy, tasty way to try dandelion flowers, I recommend adding them to cookies. Here's my recipe.

______________________

Ultimate Dandelion CookbookDid you know you can turn dandelion leaves, flowers, buds, stems, and roots into tasty and healthy treats? Learn more about eating and cooking with dandelions in my #1 Amazon Bestselling paperback or ebook, The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook.



For more information about harvesting and using dandelions, see these posts:

"Ah Sweet...Dandelions?" (including a recipe for cooking dandelion leaves)
How to Make Dandelion Tea (from the roots of the plant)
Making Dandelion Jelly
Teaching Children to Forage (with dandelion cookie recipe) 
How to Preserve Dandelion Greens
Dandelion Flower Fritters
Dandelion Leaf Noodles
Dandelion Medicine 
How to Make Dandelion Wine
Dandelion Root Medicine: Where to Find It, How & Why to Use It
Dandelion Leaf Green Smoothie


Cautions: According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, very rarely, people have reactions to dandelion. If you're allergic to "ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion. In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin. People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should consult their doctors before eating dandelion." Dandelion is a diuretic, which means it may also make other medications less effective. To learn more about this, visit the University of Maryland Medical Center website.
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Disclaimer 

I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.  
 

May 16, 2014

Dandelion Medicine: Using the Common Dandelion Medicinally

The more I learn about the common dandelion, the more I'm amazed at how unappreciated it is. If you're a regular reader, you already know what an excellent food dandelions are. (In fact, I wrote a whole  cookbook packed just with dandelion recipes.) But did you know that dandelions are great medicine, too? In Canada, dandelion is a registered health product, and for many, many centuries, the dandelion has been prized for its medicinal properties.

Dandelion roots, before dehydrating.
Dandelion Root Medicine

Perhaps the strongest dandelion medicine comes from the plant's roots, which are used to detoxify the liver (I can personally attest to how well this works), kidney, and gallbladder. Some believe the root may also help treat diabetes, yeast infections, gout, PMS (again, I've had great success here), and eczema. Dandelion root and the herb uva ursi have also been shown to reduce urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women. (Uva ursi is not safe for long term use, however.) The roots are also rich in inulin, which is a prebiotic that encourages healthy microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract, so the root is great for upset stomach, too, and may be beneficial to diabetics.

Perhaps the most exciting use of dandelion root is the treatment of cancer. There are many anecdotal accounts of the root curing cancer (click here to read one), and currently the root is being studied scientifically for the treatment of cancer.

In addition, the roots are packed with beta-carotene, calcium, vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6, B12, C, E, P, and D, biotin, inositol, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc.

For medicinal purposes, the roots are usually dried and made into a tea (click here for a complete how to). The dried root can also be ground up in a coffee grinder and added to water or juice. In orange juice, there is no detectable flavor. Drink 2 - 3 times daily.


Dandelion Leaf Medicine

Dandelion leaf.


Dandelion leaves are a scientifically proven diuretic - meaning they increase the amount of urine the body produces, and thereby reduce swelling and bloating. And unlike most other diuretics, dandelion leaves won't cause a potassium deficiency. Dandelion leaves are also thought to improve kidney function and strengthen the immune system, as well as sooth an upset stomach and put an end to constipation.

The leaves also happen to be packed with vitamin A, B, C, and K, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, carotenes, and fiber.

You can eat dandelion leaves, just like you'd eat any other greens (like kale or collards). However, you have to catch them in the early spring, before they flower and become bitter. (Bitter leaves can be made less bitter by boiling them for a minute, then changing the water and boiling again for a minute, then changing the water again and boiling for one minute...but this process also decreases the nutrients and medicinal properties in the leaves.)

You can also puree the leaves in a smoothie, or make an infusion of the leaves. For the latter, Dian Dincin Buchman, Ph.D., writes in her book Herbal Medicine that you should use one pint of boiling water for every handful of leaves (and flowers, if available). Steep for 10 minutes, then strain. If desired, add a little honey to offset bitter leaves. Drink the infusion 2 - 3 times a day. Leaves may also be dehydrated and crumbled into a tea ball to brew medicinal tea.

Dandelion flower.
Dandelion Flower Medicine

Dandelion flowers are a known diuretic and are thought to improve the immune system. The flowers are also packed with antioxidants and are a superb source of lecithin - which is believed to maintain brain function and may slow or stop Alzheimer's disease. Lecithin is also supposed to be good for the liver. Additionally, dandelion flowers are a good source of vitamins A, B, and C, beta-carotene, iron, zinc, and potassium.

For the best medicinal results, use the flowers to make a simple tea that you may drink 2 - 3 times a day. Click here for a how to. The leaves may also be dehydrated and made into tea, but bear in mind older flowers will burst into seed in the dehydrator.

Dandelion Stem Medicine

Dandelion stems are traditionally used on scrapes and cuts, to speed healing. Just break open a dandelion stem and apply the sap to the affected area.


_________________________
Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook
Did you know you can turn dandelion leaves, flowers, buds, stems, and roots into tasty and healthy treats? Learn more about eating and cooking with dandelions in my #1 Amazon Bestselling paperback or ebook, The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook.


For more information about harvesting and using dandelions, see these posts:

"Ah Sweet...Dandelions?" (including a recipe for cooking dandelion leaves)
How to Make Dandelion Tea (from the roots of the plant)
Making Dandelion Jelly
Teaching Children to Forage (with dandelion cookie recipe) 
Eating Dandelion Flowers
How to Preserve Dandelion Greens
Dandelion Flower Fritters
Dandelion Leaf Noodles
Dandelion Leaf Green Smoothie
Dandelion Root Medicine: Where to Find It, How & Why to Use It
How to Make Dandelion Wine


Cautions: According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, very rarely, people have reactions to dandelion. If you're allergic to "ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion. In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin. People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should consult their doctors before eating dandelion." Dandelion is a diuretic, which means it may also make other medications less effective. To learn more about this, visit the University of Maryland Medical Center website.





Disclaimer 
I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.  


Apr 15, 2013

How to Preserve Dandelion Greens (and other greens, too!)

If you've never tried eating dandelion leaves, early spring is the time to try. This amazing food is better for you than any popular green, including spinach. It's packed with nutrients, and a single serving has more calcium in it than a serving of milk! To learn more about nutrition in dandelion leaves, as well as a simple method of eating them, be sure to check out this post.

The only trouble with dandelion greens, as I see it, is there's such a short window of opportunity to harvest the best of the greens. That's because once the plants send out buds, the leaves grow considerably more bitter. There are ways around this (which I'll cover in an upcoming cookbook), but to get the most nutrition from dandelion leaves, you really need to harvest them in early spring, before budding. 

The good news is, dandelion leaves are very easy to preserve either by freezing, dehydrating, or canning. So once you start seeing those toothy leaves popping up, take advantage of the season and harvest as many as you can!  

NOTE: All these methods of preservation work equally well with other dark, leafy greens, including collards, kale, beet greens, turnip greens, mustard greens, and spinach.

How to Freeze Greens

1. Fill a clean sink or large bowl with ice water. Fill a pot with water and place over medium high heat. Bring to a boil.

2. Add washed dandelion leaves and cook for 1 minute. Immediately drain and place in the prepared ice water. 

3. Once the leaves are completely cool, pat them dry. Place in freezer bags. Write the date and contents on the bag and freeze for up to 1 year.

These frozen dandelion leaves are excellent in any cooked dish, including a simple saute.



How to Dehydrate Dandelion Greens
  
1. Wash dandelion leaves and pat dry. Place on the tray of a dehydrator.

2. Set at 135 degrees F. and dehydrate until completely dry and crisp. Store in an air tight container in a cool, dry, dark location. 

Dehydrated dandelion leaves are perfect for soups and stews, or for crushing and using as a seasoning.


How to Can Dandelion Greens

1. First, be sure you are completely familiar with safe pressure canning guidelines. You will need about 28 lbs. of dandelion leaves to make 7 canned quarts. 

2. Wash a handful of leaves at a time, drain, and pat dry. 

3. Fill a pot with a few inches of water and place a steamer insert on top. (The water should not reach the bottom of the steamer.) Place the leaves in the steamer, cover, and steam 3 to 5 minutes, or until completely wilted. 

4. If desired, add ½ teaspoon of salt to each canning jar. Fill each jar loosely with the leaves and pour fresh boiling water over them. Leave 1 inch headspace. Process pints for 70 minutes and quarts for 90 minutes.*

If you like canned spinach or collards, you'll probably like canned dandelion leaves, too. Eat them exactly the same way as those more familiar greens.

* NOTE: If you live at a high altitude, read this important information about adjusting canning times.

_________________________
Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook
Did you know you can turn dandelion leaves, flowers, buds, stems, and roots into tasty and healthy treats? Learn more about eating and cooking with dandelions in my #1 Amazon Bestselling paperback or ebook, The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook.


For more information about harvesting and using dandelions, see these posts:

"Ah Sweet...Dandelions?" (including a recipe for cooking dandelion leaves)
How to Make Dandelion Tea (from the roots of the plant)
Making Dandelion Jelly
Teaching Children to Forage (with dandelion cookie recipe) 
Eating Dandelion Flowers
Dandelion Flower Fritters
Dandelion Leaf Noodles
Dandelion Medicine 
Dandelion Leaf Green Smoothie
Dandelion Root Medicine: Where to Find It, How & Why to Use It
How to Make Dandelion Wine


Cautions: According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, very rarely, people have reactions to dandelion. If you're allergic to "ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion. In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin. People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should consult their doctors before eating dandelion." Dandelion is a diuretic, which means it may also make other medications less effective. To learn more about this, visit the University of Maryland Medical Center website.


Feb 28, 2011

Ah Sweet...Dandelions? With Sauteed Dandelion Greens Recipe

Eating Dandelions...with sauteed dandelion greens recipe
In our modern world, dandelions are best known as the weed gardeners constantly fight - the pesky yellow flowers that spread all-too rapidly in our lawns. But not that long ago, dandelions were considered an excellent eating herb.

In fact, dandelions are considered one of the most nutritious foods you can eat. The leaves are packed with vitamins (A, B, C, and K, particularly), potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, carotene, and fiber. Dandelion roots have long been used for gastrointestinal upsets and are high in potassium and inulin - a good carbohydrate for diabetics. The flowers are edible, too.

I read enough antique cookbooks mentioning dandelions, I couldn't help but be intrigued. I wondered what dandelions tasted like. Could I be removing a truly tasty and healthy food from my garden beds? So I decided to give dandelions a try.

NOTE: You should never eat any plant you didn't cultivate unless you've made an absolutely positive identification and have solid information it is safe to eat. If you're unsure what a dandelion looks like when it's not blooming, ask for expert help.

Where to Find Dandelions
You can see dandelions growing almost everywhere expect the desert. However, you should never eat a dandelion unless you're certain it hasn't been sprayed with herbicides or other chemicals. Therefore, I suggest sticking to dandelions in your own yard. Or, purchase them at a farmer's market.

How to Use Dandelion Leaves

The leaves are the most nutritious and oft-used part of a dandelion. Pick them in the spring, when they are young and small and do not yet have buds or flowers. This ensures the least bitter flavor. You can also blanch the leaves in boiling water for 1 minute to help remove the bitterness, but you will loose some of the nutrients in the boiling water.

Use the greens in salads. If you're sensitive to bitter foods, cook the greens with sweet vegetables like red bell peppers or carrots. You can also add the greens to soups and stews. I

In What I Learned from God While Gardening, author Niki Anderson relates how one woman washed freshly harvested dandelion greens in salt wter, then patted them dry and placed them in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Hours later, she fried three or four slices of bacon, then set the pork aside. In the resulting bacon fat, she'd add equal amounts of water, apple cider vinegar, and sugar. She stirred until the sugar dissolved. Then she put the dandelion greens in a large salad bowl, along with the crumbled bacon, then toss them with the apple cider vinegar dressing. To her children, Anderson writes, the dandelion salad was "equal to home made ice cream."

How to Use Dandelion Flowers
The flowers (all stems and sepals - the green stuff just beneath the petals - removed) should be fresh and can be tossed into salads or made into wine. In The Prudence Penny Regional Cookbook of 1958, the editor offers a traditional mid-Western dandelion wine recipe:

16 cups dandelion flowers
16 cups boiling water
2 ¼ teaspoons active yeast
6 cups granulated sugar
3 oranges (peels and all; chopped)
3 lemons (peels and all; chopped)
Pour the flowers in a large pot, then pour the boiling water over them. Allow the flowers to soak in the water for 3 days. Strain. Add the yeast, sugar, oranges, and lemons to the flowers, stirring well. Let stand for 3 weeks. Makes 8 pints. You'll find another variation, with far more complete instruction, here.



How to Use Dandelion Roots
The roots are said to be tastiest once the cold weather sets in - from fall through very early spring. They are mostly used as any root vegetable would be used, in stews, soups, and roasts.

Sauteed Dandelion Greens Recipe
After looking at a lot of dandelion green recipes, I decided they could be cooked a lot like collard greens. So here's how I presented them to my husband:

First, I roamed our yard, scissors in hand, and cut off the greens of about 5 dandelions of medium size. (After cooking, this turned out to be about enough for one person.)

I dumped the greens into a colander and washed them in running water. I removed any dirt or debris, as well as any leaves that were slightly brown or yellow. I shook the greens in the colander, getting rid of most of the water remaining on them. I tossed them in a plastic bag and put them in the crisper drawer until it was time to cook the greens.

In a small bowl, I poured about 1 tablespoon of olive oil. To this, I added 4 sliced garlic cloves and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. I let this infuse while I cooked the rest of our meal.

When the rest of the meal was done cooking, I poured the oil mixture into my cast iron skillet and heated it. I sauteed the garlic until it was just golden, then I added the greens and a little pepper. I sauteed these just a minute or two. Then I added some crumbled bacon, sauteed for about 1 minute more, and served the greens.
I wasn't sure whether I should tell my hubby what they were, but I decided I'd better(!). He was game, and we both chowed down. We liked them! They tasted a lot like collard greens. Since dandelion greens are so nutritious and since they are free and require no tending, I'm sure I'll cook them again. (UPDATE 1/10/16: Dandelion leaves are a spring staple in our household. We love them!)


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Ultimate Dandelion CookbookWant even more dandelion recipes? Get 148 dandelion flower, bud, stem, and root recipes in my #1 Amazon Bestselling paperback or ebook, The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook.



For more information about harvesting and using dandelions, see these posts:

How to Make Dandelion Tea (from the roots of the plant)
Making Dandelion Jelly
Teaching Children to Forage (with dandelion cookie recipe) 
Eating Dandelion Flowers
How to Preserve Dandelion Greens
Dandelion Flower Fritters
Dandelion Leaf Noodles
Dandelion Medicine 
How to Make Dandelion Wine
Dandelion Root Medicine: Where to Find It, How & Why to Use It
Dandelion Leaf Green Smoothie


Cautions: According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, very rarely, people have reactions to dandelion. If you're allergic to "ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion. In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin. People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should consult their doctors before eating dandelion." Dandelion is a diuretic, which means it may also make other medications less effective. To learn more about this, visit the University of Maryland Medical Center website.
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Disclaimer 

I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.