Showing posts with label Recipes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Recipes. Show all posts

Jun 18, 2019

Healthy No-Noodle Goulash - Keto, Low Carb, LCHF, Gluten Free Recipe

Keto Goulash, Low carb, LCHF, Gluten Free Recipe
This post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own. Please see FCC disclosure for full information.

When I was a kid, my mom loved to serve her family something she called "noodle roni:" a simple dish made of margarine (back when science told us it was healthier than real butter! Ugh!), macaroni noodles, and tomato juice. (I posted the recipe years ago; you can see it here.) It was a frugal meal, perfect for tight times. But to my mom's kids (including me!), who had no clue about household budgeting, noodle roni was simply a favorite. It was what we wanted when we were fighting a cold. It was comfort food. And years later, when I married and had kids, noodle roni became one of their favorites, too.

Then, near the end of 2017, after about a decade of feeling ill yet not getting real help from any doctor, I found a new M.D. who finally gave me some answers. "You're diabetic," he said. "I can put you on insulin and blood sugar lowering meds, or you can go on a keto diet." Keto? Or Needles? That was an easy choice! And it's a choice I've never regretted. While others I know are following the American Diabetes Association way of eating and progressively becoming more ill, my body is healing. Within months of starting keto, my blood sugar was normal (my last A1C was better than my doctor's), my autoimmune disease went into remission, my cholesterol and blood pressure normalized, and I lost 45 lbs. (Learn more about reducing blood sugar through a therapeutic keto diet here.)

But let's be honest: Going keto means giving up certain foods. It helps to know those foods are slowly killing you (!), but still, I missed noodle roni. Doing a little research online, I discovered most people don't call the dish noodle roni - they call it "goulash." Turns out, the dish is based on Hungarian stew and Americans have tweaked it into a tomato and noodle dish. I could have made the meal just by omitting the noodles: tomato juice, butter, and ground beef are all keto. But I didn't think it would be very filling. After a lot of time spent browsing Pinterest, I decided cabbage would make a good substitute for the noodles, rounding out the dish nicely.


My husband and I now actually think this healthy goulash is better than Mom's noodle roni. (Sorry, Mom!) My picky eater kids love it, too. So whether you want comfort food, or food to make you feel better when you're getting sick, or a frugal meal to fit into a tight budget, I hope you'll enjoy this healthy goulash, too!


https://sites.google.com/site/proverbs31womanprintables/healthy-no-noodle-goulashHealthy, No-Noodle Goulash Recipe

2 lbs. ground beef
1 medium yellow onion, diced
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 oz.) can tomato sauce
1 (25 oz.) can diced tomatoes
1 1/2 tablespoons coconut aminos (or soy sauce, if not strict keto)
2 tablespoons dried oregano
2 teaspoons dried basil
1 tablespoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
1 cabbage, cored and sliced into thin strips

1. Place a large pot of medium-high heat and add the ground beef, breaking it into small pieces with a large spoon or fork.

2. When the beef is no longer pink, pour in the onion and garlic and sautée until tender.

3. Stir in the tomato sauce, tomatoes, coconut aminos, oregano, basil, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil over medium heat.

4.  A handful at a time, add the cabbage, stirring well after each addition. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, stirring once in a while (to prevent scorching), until cabbage is tender.


Nutritional Information: It's always smart to calculate your own nutritional information using the exact products you cook with. However, the approximate nutrition per serving for this dish is, according to LoseIt!: Calories 448,  Fat 23.2g, Carbohydrates 12.8 g, Fiber 2g, Protein 35.3g 







Jan 9, 2019

Simple Low (or No) Sugar Homemade Hot Chocolate (Hot Cocoa)

Keto Hot Cocoa
This post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own. Please see FCC disclosure for full information. Thank you for supporting this site! 

Long ago, I learned that made-from-scratch hot chocolate was far and away better than store bought hot cocoa mixes. First, there's the taste. In my opinion, store bought mixes often taste chemically...and I guess they should, because they contain a lot of dubious ingredients. For example, here's the ingredient list for classic Swiss Miss Cocoa Mix:

"Modified whey, cocoa (processed with alkali), nonfat milk, maltodextrin, hodrogonated coconut oil, calcium carbonate, less than 2% off: salt, dipotassium phosphate, carrageenan, mono- and diglycerides, acesulfame potassium, sucralose, artificial flavors."
Did you know manyof those ingredients are things nutritionists say we should avoid?

I also get peeved because the container boasts "no added sugar," when in fact maltodextrin acts like sugar. Oh, and by the way, sucralose is an artificial sweetener linked to spiked blood sugar, weight gain, and increased appetite. I could go on. (For example, while coconut oil is good for you, any fat that's hydrogenated is highly processed. The Harvard School of Public Health website says such fats make our immune system to go into hyper-drive, causing inflammation that's linked to heart disease, diabetes, and just about every chronic illness.)

Which leads me to reason #2 from-scratch cocoa mix is better: The ingredients are simple and clean.

The third reason I love from-scratch hot chocolate is that it's more frugal. I'm always looking for ways to save money on our grocery bill!



And the fourth reason is that homemade hot cocoa is really just as quick to whip up as store-bought mixes.

In 2016, I posted my favorite from-scratch hot cocoa mix recipe, but since then, things have changed. Namely, I was diagnosed with diabetes. Naturally, this altered my eating habits (I went from a low sugar whole foods diet to a low carb, no sugar whole foods diet called keto; you can read about how keto has benefited me here). This also meant my kids were at higher risk of developing diabetes. That 2016 recipe isn't bad, exactly, but it is higher in carbs than I prefer. For example, it uses milk, which is naturally high in sugar. (My new recipe uses heavy cream, which not only makes for a creamier hot chocolate, but naturally reduces the sugar in the drink.)


This new recipe suits both me and my kids. It has fewer ingredients and is lower in carbs and calories, too!


https://sites.google.com/site/proverbs31womanprintables/simple-healthy-homemade-hot-chocolate-hot-cocoaSimple, Healthy Hot Chocolate Recipe (Keto Approved!)

1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder (I love this stuff, but I use this for the kids)
6 oz. boiling water
1/4 cup non-carrageenan heavy cream
sweetener*

*For my children, I use cane sugar because it is GMO-free. For myself, I add monk fruit (this is exactly what I use), which is a natural sweetener that doesn't spike blood sugar. You could use any sweetener you like, of course, though I do not recommend artificial sweeteners, which are of questionable health.

1. Place the cocoa powder in a mug and add the water.

2. Stir in the heavy cream. Add sweetener, to taste. I use a scant 1 tablespoon of sugar for my kids, and 2 - 3 drops of monk fruit for myself.

HINT: Want a more intense chocolate flavor? Add 1/8 teaspoon of instant coffee granules to your cocoa! 

If desired, top with healthy marshmallows or homemade whipping cream. 

I have yet to see any pre-made whipped cream that's healthy. Instead, pour a little heavy cream in the bowl of an electric mixer and whip it until peaks stand up in the cream when you remove the beater. Add sweetener to taste.

For those who eat sugar, these organic marshmallows are a healthier option. Better yet, make your own without sugar at all. 







Approximate nutrition without whipping cream or marshmallows, according to LoseIt. (Depending upon products used, your version may vary.) Without Sugar: Calories: 210; Fat: 20.5 g; Protein: 1g.; Carbs: 3 g. With 1 tablespoon sugar: Calories: 225; Fat: 20.5 g; Protein: 1 g.; Carbs: 7 g.

Jan 2, 2019

Most Popular Posts from 2018

This post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own. Please see FCC disclosure for full information. Thank you for supporting this site! 

Another year come and gone. To me, it seems time speeds up each year! But now that Chritmas and New Year's are over, I need to hunker down and get to work. I'm currently finishing up a historical fashion book for Dover Publications. (Years ago, historical fashion books were my mainstay and I've enjoying getting back into that subject.) And as usual, this year I want to try to make this blog better than ever...meaning, I want to hear from you! What do you wish I'd blog more about? Let me know in the comments or through a social media message.

This is also the time of year I look at this blog's stats to see if I can understand my wonderful readers even better. It's always fasncinating to see which posts you like best.

1.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2018/12/deciding-what-to-plant-in-your.html

2.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2018/12/23-fun-practcal-ways-to-upcycle-feed.html
3.

https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2018/03/how-to-dehydrate-zoodles-other.html
4.

https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2018/01/why-and-how-to-prune-blueberries.html
5.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2018/06/the-biggest-lie-about-growing-tomatoes.html

6.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2018/05/can-you-grow-fruit-trees-from-seed.html

7.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2018/04/the-best-salsbury-steak-recipe-keto-low.html

8.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2018/11/the-ultimate-dandelion-medicine-book-is.html
 9.
10.

https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2018/11/his-grace-is-revealed-through-parenting.html


I also look at which posts are all-time favorites:



https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2014/09/how-to-easily-clean-ceilings-walls-even.html
4.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2014/09/how-to-easily-clean-ceilings-walls-even.html
5.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2011/05/the-best-free-apron-patterns-on-net.html
6.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2013/03/best-ideas-for-upcycling-jeans.html
7.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2017/09/50-low-carb-and-keto-thanksgiving.html
8.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2012/04/how-to-clean-really-dirty-stove-top.html
9.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2014/05/how-to-make-dandelion-wine-recipe-for.html
10.
https://proverbsthirtyonewoman.blogspot.com/2013/08/canning-pickled-green-beans-dilly-beans.html
Happy new year!

Aug 22, 2018

Keto Sloppy Joes Recipe (Low Carb, Paleo, Diabetic, Gluten Free)

Low carb, Paleo, Diabetic, Gluten Free Sloppy Joes
Every mom needs a good, homemade sloppy Joe recipe. The canned stuff is inferior in both flavor and nutrition (not to mention it's full of questionable ingredients), but homemade sloppy Joes are a quick and easy meal. Back in 2012, I posted my recipe for crock pot sloppy Joes, but when I went keto in order to reverse my diabetes, I had to modify that recipe. So without further ado, here's how I make sloppy Joes that are low carb, keto, Paleo, and gluten-free.

 https://sites.google.com/site/proverbs31womanprintables/home/keto-sloppy-joe-recipe-1Keto Sloppy Joe Recipe


about 1 1/2 lbs. ground beef (I use 80% lean)
2 - 3 celery stalks, sliced thin
1 green bell pepper, chopped
1 small yellow onion, chopped
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/3 cup low or no sugar ketchup
keto buns (optional)*


1. Brown the ground beef in a large skillet.

2. Add the celery, bell pepper, and onion and saute until the veggies are tender.

3. Add the red pepper flakes, Worcestershire sauce, and ketchup, stirring well to combine. Warm for a minute or two.

Serve on keto buns, if desired. (*Tthe Internet is full of recipes for keto-friendly bread and hamburger buns; here is one I have tried and liked.) I prefer to eat these sloppy Joes without any bread. For my carbavore kids, I serve with regular hamburger buns.

Crock Pot Version:

1. Place all the ingredients in the crockpot. Add 1/4 cup of water.  Stir to combine.

2. Cook on low for 4 to 6 hours.







Makes about 6 servings. Estimated nutrition, according to LoseIt: 254 calories; 21 g. protein; 7.6 g. carbs; .61 g. fiber; 13.6 g. fat. (Bear in mind that your nutrition information may vary depending upon the catsup you use. If you choose to eat bread along with the filling, you'll have to add that to your carb count, also.)





Jul 10, 2018

Low Carb and Keto Pizza Options

This post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own. Please see FCC disclosure for full information. Thank you for supporting this site!

 Whenever people hear I'm on a keto diet, first they are amazed at my results (blood sugar normalized after previously needing insulin, blood pressure and cholesterol normalized, hidradenitis supporativa in remission, regained energy, and 45 lbs. lost effortlessly!). But then most people say something like, "Wow, I could never eat like that. I need my [insert carby food here]." I think this shows just how addicted to carbs (which are reduced to sugar in the body) many people are. Still, I always let them know that you can almost always find a keto version of whatever carby food you think you can't live without (which I recommend they save as a treat, rather than eating daily). For many people, this food is pizza.

Turns out, there are a lot of ways to eat pizza without a fattening crust. (Cause with keto, we aren't worried about all that cheese, unless someone has an intolerance to it - in which case they can use dairy subs.) Here are just a few you can choose from.
Fat Head Pizza by Fat Head.
Many people consider this the Holy Grail of low carb/keto pizzas. It is pretty dang good, in my opinion. You can also omit the egg and have a decent crust, also (which is good for people like me who are allergic or intolerant to eggs).


On Pinterest, you'll find a lot of variations for this type of pizza, but this basic recipe is a great start. This stuff is so popular, you can even buy a version in the frozen section of many grocery stores!

Ultimate Cheese Crust Pizza by Cut the Wheat.
Cheese crust pizza is a quick and easy favorite at my house. I often simply scatter shredded mozzarella onto a parchment paper lined baking sheet, pop it into the oven until it's just beginning to turn golden, add pizza sauce and toppings, and return to the oven until a little more golden. I can never seem to get a crispy crust, but it sure is delish! Here's a skillet version to try, too.

Pork Rind Pizza by Hey Keto Mama.
I don't like eating pork rinds by themselves. (Yuck!) But I have learned that you can turn pork rinds into some pretty amazing dishes. (My favorite keto pancakes are made with pork rinds!) I haven't yet tried making a pizza crust from them, but folks tell me it's pretty amazing.

Cauliflower Pepperoni Pizza Casserole by Closet Cooking.
Sometimes you don't need a crust at all, as with this tasty pizza casserole. When I make this,  I like to add more meat - like sausage - to make it a heartier meal for my growing kids.

Zucchini Pizza Boats by Cooking Classy.
Using a low carb veggie as the crust is another way to go. Zucchini is a popular choice, as is Portabella mushrooms.







Or you can shred the zucchini and make a more bread-like pizza crust. Here's a similar recipe using spinach.
Cauliflower Pizza Crust by Eat a Great Deal.
No low carb pizza collection would be complete without at least one cauliflower crust pizza. You can also buy cauliflower crust pizzas in the frozen section of many grocery stores, but they often have questionable ingredients and are too high carb for true keto-ers.

Spinach Tomato Meatza by Low Carb Yum.
Meatza is a popular low carb choice. Basically, instead of a crust, you use meat (usually ground beef or ground beef and sausage), then put pizza toppings on it to make a sort of casserole.



When I don't have a lot of time to make dinner, I throw pizza into my Instant Pot. I double this recipe for my family of four. Sometimes I also make this recipe in the oven: Layer the ingredients in a casserole dish - using cooked beef - and bake at 350 degrees until heated through and bubbly.

For a quick pizza fix, using deli meat as a crust works well. Just add the toppings of your choice.

Pizza in a Bowl by My Montana Kitchen.
An even quicker and easier way to tame your pizza craving is to put all the toppings you love in a bowl, then heat it in the microwave or oven.


There are almost too many low carb pizza choices! You just have to find which ones you like best. Happy sampling!

Apr 24, 2018

The BEST Salsbury Steak Recipe (Keto, Low Carb, LCHF)

keto recipe, low carb recipe, LCHF recipe, diabetic recipe
I have kids. And being kids, they are picky eaters. In fact, the only things I can count on them always eating are pizza, hot dogs, and hamburgers...Oh, and Salsbury steak! Actually, Salsbury steak has become one of my entire family's favorite meals, and this recipe (which I orgianlly found over at Low Carb Mavin) pleases everyone - whether or not they are eating keto.

P.S. I know the photo shows a very large serving of meat. I don't eat so much meat! It's my hubby's serving :)


https://sites.google.com/site/proverbs31womanprintables/home/the-best-salsbury-steak-recipeThe BEST Salsbury Steak Recipe


1 1/4 lbs. ground beef (I use 80/20 ground chuck)
3 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons Montreal Steak Seasoning
1/4 cup crushed pork rinds (If you oppose this ingredient and aren't low carb, sub breadcrumbs; you may also omit this ingredient altogether, but the resulting Salsbury steak isn't nearly as good!)
1/4 cup + 1/3 cup heavy cream
Salt
Pepper
Bacon drippings or olive oil 
1/4 cup finely diced yellow onion
8 oz. button mushrooms, chopped fine
1/4 cup water
1 teaspoon beef stock or bouillion
1 tablespoon butter





1. In a small bowl, combine the pork rinds (or breadcrumbs) and 1/4 cup heavy cream. Set aside and allow to soak for about 10 minutes.

2. In a medium bowl, use your hands to combine ground beef, Worcestershire, and Montreal seasoning. With a spoon, stir in the pork rind mixture.

3. Divide the beef mixture into 4 sections and form each into patties. Season both sides of each patty with salt and plenty of pepper.

4. Warm a large skillet over medium heat. One hot, add a teaspoon or two of bacon drippings or oil. Once melted, add the beef patties.

5. Cook beef patties until their internal temperature reaches 160 degrees F. Remove from the skillet and set on a plate, tenting with foil. Set aside.

6. Reduce heat to medium and add the mushrooms. (If there's little fat in the pan, add a dollop of butter.) Saute for about 1 minute. Add the onions and saute until tender.

7. Add the stock and water, deglazing the pan by scraping up any browned bits on the bottom of the skillet.

8. Add the cream and any juices that have accumulated on the plate the patties are sitting on. Simmer until sauce thickens a bit. Stir in the butter and season with salt and pepper.

9. Serve the patties with sauce spooned over them.

Makes 4 servings. Estimated nutrition, according to SuperTracker: 430 calories; 27 g. protein; 4 g. carbs; 1 g. fiber; 34 g. fat.


Feb 28, 2018

How to Grow and Use Parsley for Food and Medicine

How to Grow and Use Parsley for Medicine and Food
This post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own. Please see FCC disclosure for full information. Thank you for supporting this site! 

Flat leaf parsley (petroselinum crispum) is one of those herbs I used to omit from every recipe that called for it. I didn't figure it made much of a difference, flavor-wise - and most recipes only called for a small amount, yet I had to buy a large bunch at the store. I didn't want to waste food or money. But when we moved here, one of the herbs already growing on our homestead was a large clump of parsley...and I have to admit, it's one of the easiest-growing plants I've ever had. It comes back earlier than any other edible, is care-free, and produces abundantly. I'm not one to let such a blessing pass by, unused. So recently, I've been researching the best ways to use up a lot of parsley.


How to Use Fresh Parsley

First and foremost, I'm learning to use fresh parsley leaves. No longer do I omit parsley from recipes. In fact, I'm learning to add the herb to most of what I cook. Eggs for breakfast? I add a sprinkling of chopped parsley. Tuna or chicken salad for lunch? I stir in chopped parsley. Soup or stew or casserole or any type of meat for dinner? I add chopped parsley. Salad as a side? I include some parsley leaves.

And as I do this, I'm finding that parsley adds a freshness and brightness to each dish that was previously missing.
Remove the leaves from the stems when cooking with parsley. Courtesy of Kelley Boone.






There are also some dishes that feature parsley prominently. These include:

Parsley (English) Pesto
Parsley Butter
Parsley Salt (made the same way I make celery salt)
Chimichurri sauce
Cream of Parsley Soup
Parsley Salad
Tabbouleh 
"Green Goddess" Sauce
Fried Parsley
Gremolata

Parsley pesto. Courtesy of Katrin Gilger.

Preserving Parsley

I find the easiest way to preserve parsley is to dehydrate it. I simply remove the leaves from their stems, lay them in a single layer on an electric dehydrator tray (this is the current model of what I use) and dehydrate at 95 degrees F. until crisp. I store the dehydrated leaves whole, in an air tight jar in a dark, cool location. To use, I simply crush the leaves in my hand and sprinkle into whatever I'm cooking. (Crushing herbs before storing them ensures the loss much of their flavor and medicinal properties.)

Some people prefer to freeze parsley. I've done this by simply throwing whole leaves in a freezer bag, and then breaking off however much of the herb I want when I'm cooking. But you can also chop up parsley leaves and place clumps in an ice cube tray to freeze. Once fully frozen, transfer to a freezer bag. You may also mix the leaves with a little olive oil before freezing them in an ice cube tray.

Parsley roots are edible and medicinal.
Eating Parsley Root

The root of the parsley plant looks very much like a parsnip (or a tan carrot). I have yet to try it, but some people say it tastes like a mixture of celery, carrots, and turnips. The root is typically harvested in winter or early spring and is eaten much like other root vegetables. Remember, of course, that if you take the plant's root, you are effectively removing parsley from your garden - so if you want to keep growing the plant for its leaves, be sure to only remove the root in order to thin out a clump of parsley.

Here are some recipes to try:

Parsley Root Soup
Parsley Root Fries
Mashed Potatoes and Parsley Root
Roasted Root Vegetables
Parsley Root Stew





Parsley Medicine
Parsley root, seed, and leaf are medicinal.


Parsley is a pretty powerful little herb. It's packed with antioxidant flavonoids, phenolic compounds, folate, iron, calcium, potassium, and magnesium, as well as vitamins K, C, and A. Traditionally, it's considered a "bitter" herb, good for aiding in digestive issues. Herbalists use it to reduce inflammation, improve or prevent anemia, boost immunity, and treat kidney stones, bladder infections, bloating, gas, gout, acid reflux, constipation, and PMS. Parsley also has antibacterial and antifungal properties.

When used as medicine, parsley leaves are often brewed into a tea, or used as an essential oil. Parsley seeds are also used in traditional medicine, especially for normalizing menstruation and treating menstrual pain. (Never use garden seeds for medicine, as they are usually sprayed with chemicals.) Parsley roots are medicinal, too, and herbalists use them mostly in the form of a tincture.

How to Grow Parsley

Like most herbs, parsley is extremely easy to grow. However, the seeds are a wee bit tricky to germinate: First, soak the seeds overnight in warm water. Direct sow outdoors in the spring or sow indoors 6 - 12 weeks before the last spring frost.

Plant seedlings in containers or directly into the soil. The plant isn't picky about soil, but prefers it rich in nitrogen. Grow in full sun or part shade. If your winters are harsh, mulch the plant well or it will die when temperatures drop.

Harvest stems before the plant flowers in the late summer or fall, or the herb will probably take on a bitter flavor. To keep parsley from growing "leggy" always cut off stems at the base of the plant.







CAUTION: It's possible to be allergic to any plant, and parsley is no exception. Some people experience contact dermitis from touching parsley, while others experience an allergic reaction to eating it. One side effect of having an allergic reaction may be the sensation that parsley is very spicey. Parsley oil should never be used during pregnancy and those experiencing inflammatory kidney ailments should never consume parsley in large doses.


Disclaimer: I am not a doctor, nor should anything on this website (www.ProverbsThirtyOneWoman.blogspot.com) be considered medical advice. The FDA requires me to say that products mentioned, linked to, or displayed on this website are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this web site is designed for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice or care. There are no assurances of the information being fit or suited to your medical needs, and to the maximum extent allow by law disclaim any and all warranties and liabilities related to your use of any of the information obtained from the website. Your use of this website does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. No information on this website should be considered complete, nor should it be used as a substitute for a visit to, consultation with, or the advice of a physician or other qualified health care provider.

Jan 31, 2018

Cauliflower Rice "Mac & Cheese" - Keto, LCHF, Low Carb Recipe

Cheesy Cauli-Rice
I've now gone down 5 clothing sizes - a wonderful side effect of reversing my diabetes by eating a keto (ketogenic) diet. Happy dance! An awful lot of people are interested in how I've taken control of my health through diet, but most of them, upon hearing how I eat, say, "Oh, I could never give up potatoes" or "I couldn't live without pasta." I find this sad, largely because the keto diet is pretty effortless. It's incredibly freeing to no longer crave carby foods, nor feel constantly hungry because of them. Keto is so satisfying, you honestly don't miss all those old comfort foods.

And you can create new comfort foods that are  FANTASTIC, yet so much healthier! Enter my cauliflower rice "mac & cheese." Creamy, cheesy goodness, people! And all from a low carb veggie.

https://sites.google.com/site/proverbs31womanprintables/home/cauliflower-rice-mac-cheese-recipeCauliflower Rice "Mac & Cheese" Recipe

Cauli-rice from 1 medium cauliflower head (learn to make your own here, or buy about 24 oz. in the frozen vegetable section. Just be sure prepared cauli-rice has no added ingredients)
1/4 cup heavy cream
1 1/2 cups grated Cheddar cheese (or any cheese of your choice)
Butter
Salt
Pepper

1. Melt about 2 tablespoons of butter in a large skillet placed over medium heat.

2. Add the cauli-rice and cook until soft and translucent, adding more butter if necessary to keep the "rice" from sticking to the pan.

3. When the "rice" is tender, add the cream and grated cheese. Cook, stirring occassionally, until the cheese melts and the mixture is bubbly. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm.







Makes about 5 servings. Estimated nutrition, according to SuperTracker: 248 calories; 11 g. protein; 7 g. carbs; 2 g. fiber; 21 g. fat.